Huckleberry Finn: the Caring Characteristics of Jim

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Throughout the entire novel, Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain, Jim has clearly been the most loyal, honest friend to his peers. Jim shows his kindness mostly to Huck, but the most apparent instance where Jim’s loyal characteristics show is at the end of the book when he gives up his freedom to help Tom Sawyer who was shot in the leg. I am not shocked at all about Jim’s decision to do this, largely because he showed great character to everyone he met and always took care of the people he knew. One of the greatest moments in the book, personally, was when Huck and Jim were together on Jackson’s island, taking turns, keeping lookout. Jim is depicted as a great friend and caring person for the first time when Huck says, “I went to sleep, and Jim didn't call me when it was my turn. He often done that” (23.30).This part in the book really resonated with me and showed me how kind of a person Jim was. Another instance where Jim proves to be a great friend is when he says,"Pooty soon I'll be a-shout'n' for joy, en I'll say, it's all on accounts o' Huck; I's a free man, en I couldn't ever ben free ef it hadn' ben for Huck; Huck done it. Jim won't ever forgit you, Huck; you's de bes' fren' Jim's ever had; en you's de ONLY fren' ole Jim's got now." (16.14) Jim recognizes the great relationship he has with Huck and again, Jim shows his great character and how he is a good friend. It was not at all surprising that Jim would help a friend out, even if it meant losing his freedom, because it is completely in-character for Jim to carry out a good deed. Jim is model in this book, always looking out for his friends and caring for others.
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