Huck Finn

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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, By Mark Twain

Literary Time Period:
Realism, in the form of writing, is when the author uses characters to depict subjects the way they are in everyday life. Realism describes what the world is like without using embellishment or exaggeration. The main point of Realism is to give a truthful and accurate representation of a certain subject even if that emphasizes the horrible ways of society. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is a work of Realism and because it is written in this form, it reveals the truth of the time period. Many works during the time of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries used realism, like Mark Twain, as a way to show life and society the way they were without the opinions of the author themselves. The work reflects the time period by showing one character’s point of view at a certain time in history. Huck Finn’s time period takes place before the Civil War. Thus, the viewers can read a middle class person’s point of view of the world at the time. Readers can see small details of life and society at the time and can conclude a small glimpse of why one event occurred in history. Because the novel takes place before the Civil war, Huck always describes how the south had so many slaves and how society viewed their place by degrading them.

Point of View:
The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is written from the view of Huckleberry Finn, the main character in the novel. The views of the novel might not reflect the opinions of Mark Twain. With Huck being the narrator of the story, the readers are shown a literal side to the nineteenth century without judgment. Mark Twain may or may not have put his own opinions in the book, but if they are his opinions he put them into the book in a practical and literal way with the narrator.

It seems that Mark Twain’s purpose of the novel is to simply show what life was like in the south during the nineteenth century. Mark Twain uses Huck as the...
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