Huck Finn

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In the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, two characters reject society, and spontaneously adventure the south. In this novel, they run into many endeavors in which they must overcome. In this essay, I will reveal how characters such as Miss Watson, Mrs. Loftus, Aunt Sally, the Dauphin and Duke, the Sheperdsons and Grangerfords and Huck Finn expose hypocrisy and duality. With these themes present throughout this non fictional story, you can see how characters support this theme. The widow exemplifies this theme in quite some ways. In the beginning of the novel, the widow tells Huck not to smoke tobacco. She, however, takes snuff whenever she wants to.. On the same page, Huck tells the reader that she would read stories about Moses and the widow acts religious when, in fact, she isn’t (2-2). There isn’t much of an indication that the widow was okay with Miss Watson owning a slave, yet if she were real “religious” she would’ve did something about it such as set Jim free. The are just a few examples of hypocrisy and duality in this novel. Mrs. Loftus, a character introduced more towards the beginning of the story, is a character in which hypocrisy or duality is least expected. This lady is so kind to Huck and one of the characters in which the audience would expect to possess as hypocritical symbol. In the novel she gives a Huck a sense of relief after she states to him that Huck can call her at anytime he needs her. With this information present in the novel, it is hard to expect this character to be a racist. In chapter 11, it is told that Mrs. Loftus’s husband is looking for Jim. This reveals that this character may have a sweet side but she is yet still very selfish. She tells Huck (“the powerful white guy”) that if he is ever in trouble to give her a ring. Yet Huck’s partner Jim is in the midst of getting captured for a quick profit. Mrs. Loftus is a very well educated intelligent white older lady, which would give the reader the idea that she wouldn’t be racist in any form. This character represents hypocrisy and duality in an incognito sense. Aunt Sally, or Tom Sawyer’s aunt, was a white character in which proved to be a dualistic character in this book. She was such a sweet innocent character, or so it appeared. This lady had two different sides. She gave the audience a sense of comfort with her heartwarming care she provided, yet she still believed in slavery. The worst part about this entire situation is that Silas Phelps was the one who bought him and sweet Aunt Sally condones this. In many ways both Silas and Sally represent hypocrisy by playing the religious card yet enforcing slavery by practicing it. In Chapter 36, the audience is told that Jim received prayer from Silas and Sally. Religion and slavery are two completely different concepts and have no relevance whatsoever. The Duke and Dauphin are two characters introduced in Chapter 19 of this novel. They are two con men in which will do anything for money, despite the feelings of anybody. They are both escaping their town after the town’s people are enraged after getting ripped off in some form. These characters represent duality and hypocrisy at the beginning when we first meet them. One of the con men would preach at temperance meetings while he was drunk. These two men also would make quick cash by conning people into going to their shows which were always terrible. This shows us that they were benefiting for themselves and nobody else. However, they didn’t get away with it as they would get things thrown at them and get run out of town. They show the readerobvious forms of hypocrisy and duality. In Chapter 17, new characters are revealed. These characters make blatantly obvious representations of the theme of this essay. There are two families, the Sheperdsons and Grangerfords. The two families have a feud, and without second thought, would kill one another. The symbolism in this is described in which the two families are extremely religious. They go to...
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