Hrm-Recruitment and Selection Process

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Human resources: recruitment and selection – STUDENT COPY

Introduction3
1 Overview3
2 Effective recruitment and selection3
3 Person–job fit or person–organisation fit?5
3.1 A two-way process5
3.2 Person–job fit5
3.3 Person–organisation fit6
4 Specifying job and person requirements6
4.1 Initial assessment6
Description7
4.2 Job analysis7
Box 1: Checklist – undertaking a job analysis7
4.3 Organisational analysis9
4.4 Job description9
Example 1: Job description for a Buying Manager9
4.5 Person specification11
4.6 Recruiting and selecting internal candidates14
4.7 Attracting applicants14
Box 2: Sources of recruits14
4.8 Advertising15
Box 3: Contents of a job advertisement15
4.9 Further particulars, application forms and dealing with paperwork16 4.10 Shortlisting17
4.11 References19
4.12 Candidates make decisions too19
Box 4: Internet recruitment19
5 Methods of selection20
5.1 The interview as a selection method: pros and cons20 5.2 Tests as a selection tool20
Box 5: Selection tests20
5.3 The selection interview21
Box 6: Considerations in interview preparation22
5.4 Structuring the interview23
Example 2: Interview weaknesses23
Box 7: Examples of organisation fit questions25
5.5 Closing and deciding26
Example 3: Meeting the criteria26
6 Summary27
Do this28
Try this28
References28
Acknowledgements29

Introduction

In this session we look at the first stage of managing people – attracting and selecting staff. Recruitment and selection are usually considered as one process. However, we will make the distinction here between the initial actions and considerations when planning staff recruitment and the process of selecting an individual from a pool of applicants. Recruitment needs to be carefully planned in order to attract the right type of applicant. Ultimately, this increases the chances of making a suitable selection and appointment. Your involvement may be limited to a discussion of the need for a particular job within your team or work area, or you may be required to interview job applicants. Whatever your involvement, this session makes it clear that it is important for you to understand the whole process to make an effective contribution to the staffing of your organisation. After studying this unit you should be able to:

• list the skills and knowledge needed to conduct full and fair recruitment and selection, and be able to undertake it systematically.

1 Overview

The unit begins by looking at how it can be difficult for a manager in the process of recruitment and selection to maintain objectivity. Drawing up clear criteria to use throughout recruitment and selection can help the process. It then addresses the difference between the person–job and person–organisation approaches to recruitment. Subsequent sections review the different tasks to be completed and the different methods which can be used by the manager in this important process.

2 Effective recruitment and selection

The key to successful recruitment is to ensure that the criteria of suitability are overt and relevant to the job itself. Once these criteria are agreed and shared it is possible to make more rational decisions about someone's suitability for a job, based on evidence rather than ‘gut feeling’ or instinct. Effective recruitment and selection should not be about the luck of the draw. Systematic planning and preparation will increase the likelihood of taking on the right person. The key to effective recruitment is preparation: knowing the job and what is required of someone to perform it well. The costs of recruiting the wrong person can be significant. The cost of employing someone may be at least twice their salary when factors such as training, expenses and employer's contributions to their pension...
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