Hr Practicies and Job Satisfation of Employees of Surat Diamond Industry

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INDEX

CHAPTER NO.| PARTICULAR| PAGE NO.|
1. | INTRODUCTION| 3|
2. | REVIEW OF LITERATURE| 4|
3. | THEORETICAL FOUNDATION| 5|
4. | RESEARCH METHODOLOGY| 6-10|
| * RESEARCH PROBLEM STATEMENT| 6|
| * RESEARCH OBJECTIVE| 6|
| * OPERATIONAL DEFINITIONS OF THE VARIABLES| 6|
| * VARIABLE UNDER STUDY| 7|
| * TYPE OF RESEARCH| 8|
| * DATA COLLECTION PLAN| 8|
| * SAMPLING PLAN| 8|
| * INSTRUMENT DESIGN| 8|
| * DATA ANALYSIS PLAN| 9|
| * BENEFITS AND SCOPE OF RESEARCH| 9|
| * LIMITATIONS | 10|
| * FIELD WORK MANAGEMENT| 10|
5. | DATA ANALYSIS| 11-17|
6. | CONCLUSION| 18|
7. | SUGGESTION| 18|
8. | BIBLIOGRAPHY | 19|
9. | ANNEXURE | 20|
| - QUESTIONNAIRE| 20|
| - DATA ENTRY TABLE IN SPSS| 22|

CHAPTER 1 : INTRODUCTION

HR PRACTICES

HR practices can be defined as any practice that deals with enhancing competencies, commitment and culture building. The practice can take the form of a system, a process, an activity, a norm, a rule, an accepted or expected habit, or just a way of doing things. Good HR practices do indeed make a difference in terms of business effectiveness. Good HR practices are those that contribute to one or more of the three C’s: Competencies, commitment and culture.

JOB SATISFACTION

Job satisfaction has been defined as a pleasurable emotional state resulting from the appraisal of one’s job; an affective reaction to one’s job; and an attitude towards one’s job. Weiss (2002) has argued that job satisfaction is an attitude but points out that researchers should clearly distinguish the objects of cognitive evaluation which are affect (emotion), beliefs and behaviors. This definition suggests that we form attitudes towards our jobs by taking into account our feelings, our beliefs, and our behaviors. SURAT DIAMOND INDUSTRY

In Surat, the second largest city of Gujarat and one of its main industrial centres, approx imately 150,000 workers are earning a living in the diamond industry. Especially in the 1960s and 1970s, when the industry grew tremendously, the working and living conditions of diamond cutters were bad. Workshop owners used extreme violence, torture and even murder to discipline workers. After the mid-1980s the situation improved, but even today for many diamond cutters life in Surat's diamond workshops is hard. Despite these condi tions there have never been any strikes or organised forms of mass protest in the history of the diamond industry of Surat. In this article a number of possible reasons for this absence are discussed. One of these is recent developments within the caste to which both diamond cutters and workshop owners belong. India, especially Surat cuts and polishes 60 per cent of the world's diamonds and sells 40 per cent of it to the US, the world's largest finished jewellery consumer. The industry, which contributes 12.51 per cent of the country's total merchandise export, accounts for nearly 55 per cent of the world's net exports of cut and polished diamonds in value terms, 90 per cent in terms of pieces and 80 per cent in terms of carats. According to RBI, diamond industry in Gujarat accounts for 72 per cent of the world's processed diamonds and 80 per cent of India's diamond exports. Today, top quality, expensive stones are cut in Surat that can give a run for their money to those cut in Antwerp, New York and Tel Aviv. As opposed to the traditional, family run small cutting and polishing units, today's workshops are larger and professionally managed, keeping to international industrial standards. Most of the companies are smart enough to set up branches in the cities like Antwerp and Tel Aviv, so that the local workers can absorb the tricks of the trade. 

CHAPTER 2 : REVIEW OF LITERATURE

This section briefly talks about the conceptual framework and researches conducted in...
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