Hr Policies

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HR Policies & Employment Legislation
Why policies are important
Policies serve several important functions:
* Communicate values and expectations for how things are done at your organization * Keep the organization in compliance with legislation and provide protection against employment claims * Document and implement best practices appropriate to the organization * Support consistent treatment of staff, fairness and transparency * Help management to make decisions that are consistent, uniform and predictable * Protect individuals and the organization from the pressures of expediency  

Defining policy and procedure
A policy is a formal statement of a principle or rule that members of an organization must follow. Each policy addresses an issue important to the organization's mission or operations. A procedure tells members of the organization how to carry out or implement a policy. Policy is the "what" and the procedure is the "how to". Policies are written as statements or rules. Procedures are written as instructions, in logical steps. Policies are ground rules that keep people and processes in order. HR, or human resource, policies are those that are written for the workplace, and must be adhered to by employees. Steps in Policy Development

Your workplace is unique and therefore you may need to develop policies very specific to your organization and type of work, for which there are no templates or benchmarks. Typically, policy development will follow the following steps: STEP 1: Establish need for a policy

In its simplest form, a policy is a written record of a workplace rule.  It is time to develop a policy when:
* There is legislation that expressly requires an organization has a policy in place * There is legislation that does not expressly require an organization have a policy, but the regulations and steps to be followed are tightly defined and a policy will help to ensure the organization is in compliance * There is inconsistency in how employees behave or managers make decisions that is negatively impacting the work environment or accomplishment of business * There is significant confusion about certain areas of the business or how things are done and the organization would benefit from a policy Making the decision to develop a new policy should not be taken lightly: * Policies are developed for the many, not the few – when you bring a policy into force you are establishing a standard that will apply broadly across the organization - not just to a few individuals who may be causing problems * A policy creates a rule or standard to be followed consistently and reduces management’s flexibility to treat each situation as unique * Poorly written and implemented policies can harm rather than protect your organization * It can be difficult to change policies once they have been implemented and become part of your organization’s culture and ways of working You want to be sure that any policies you bring into the organization address a real need and are in line with what your company values and how work should be accomplished. You also need to ensure managers have the skills and resources to be able to implement and monitor the policy. Areas where policies are commonly established:

Be sure to review relevant federal and provincial employment legislation to understand the policies that are required for compliance in your jurisdiction. Organizations commonly have written policies in the following areas: * Code of Conduct

* Working conditions
* Attendance
* Hours of Operations
* Recruitment
* Compensation
* Performance Management
* Learning and development
* Overtime
* Privacy
* Vacation
* Grievance/Conflict Resolution
* Formal complaint process
* Disciplinary
* Discrimination and Harassment/Respectful Workplace
* Health and Safety
* Accident Reporting
* Workplace Violence
* General policy on...
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