Hr Management - Be Motivated

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Contents

Page 3 – introduction
Page 4/5 – Motivational Theories
Page 6 - Rewards
Page 7/8 – Performance Cycles and Appraisals
Page 9 – Factors determining Pay
Page 10 – Cessation/Exit procedures
Page 11/12 – Legal and Regulatory Framework
Page 13 – Conclusion
Page 14 - Bibliography

Introduction

This report will explain the link between motivational theory and reward, evaluate the process of job evaluation and other factors determining pay, asses the effectiveness of reward systems in different contexts, examine the methods organisations use to monitor employee performance, identify the reasons for cessation of employment with an organisation, describe the employment exit procedures used by two organisations, and this report will also consider the impact of the legal and regulatory framework on employment cessation arrangements.

Most companies motivate their staff in order to receive better results, performance, good attendance, growth of the company and improved individual behaviour. Motivation can show a business an individual’s ability to perform, which will enable the company to see if any training or development is needed. However, reward systems can also be put in place by businesses. Rewards can be things such as; bonuses, flexible working, staff discount, free or reduced rate health benefits, discounted gym membership etc. Motivation focuses on the individual and how they can achieve better results for both the company and the individual, whereas rewards are giving the individual something extra outside of work to compliment good work. “Guest et al (1998) notes that in recent years there is evidence of the formation of the psychological contract – this has resulted in better organisational commitment and motivation for employees.” Bratton & Gold (2003) The Psychological contract is over and above the written contract, the written contract includes: hours, wages, holidays, health & safety, job title, pensions, length of contract, probationary period etc. The Psychological contract includes training – up skilling, it looks at future opportunities, career paths, and work/life balance (i.e. flexible hours). “Primarily, the Psychological Contract refers to the relationship between an employer and its employees, and specifically concerns mutual expectations of inputs and outcomes.” Business Balls (2010)

“There are many academic theories that exist within the field of employee motivation. Some of the arguments of the theories are identical and the differences are the proponents of the same. However, the provisions and arguments of some of the theories are different, depending on the motivation of the proponents and their worldview.” Smith, C (2010) Maslow’s Theory focuses on fundamental human needs, Maslow suggests that individuals are motivated by different factors at work, the hierarchy of needs includes:

This theory can allow managers to create career paths for their employees and build a better relationship with them. Not only can the hierarchy of needs be used for an individual, but for an organisation as well.

Maslow’s theory can be applied to many different job descriptions and organisations which is why it is such a great motivational theory, however there is one point which may be a disadvantage; everyone’s hierarchy of needs are different, so if you are a business you cannot build one hierarchy and expect a good performance for all of your employees because it will not satisfy every employee’s needs. Everyone is different and everyone has different thoughts to each other. Elton Mayo’s theory of Human Relations suggests that teamwork is an important motivator, and managers should take an interest in their workers. Also while Mayo carried out this experiment at the Hawthorne factory of the Western Electric Company he stated that physical conditions and pay matter less than social interaction when motivating...
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