Hpv Proposal

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Human Papillomavirus Vaccination



Policy Memorandum
To: Federal Legislator
Subject: Mandating that all school aged females should receive a vaccination against the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Date: March 1, 2011


The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) claim that the Human papillomavirus (HPV) infects approximately 20 million people in the United States with 6.2 million new cases each year (CDC, 2009). 99.7% of cervical cancers are linked to human papillomavirus (CDC, 2009). Statistically it is known that an astounding 80% of females by the age of 50 years will eventually become infected with this virus. These individuals may present with symptoms, or the absence of them. Currently there is no treatment for HPV, only treatment for related health problems.  Prevention and abstinence is the only way to ultimately avoid this virus. There are more than 30 strains of HPV that infect at least half of sexually active people in their lifetime.  Most strains of HPV do not produce any symptoms and disappear on their own. The most common strands that are acquired via sexual contact are 6, 11, 16 and 18 (FDA, 2006). The first two 6 and 11 cause genital warts, whereas 16 and 18 are carcinogenic. Screening and compliance to an appropriate Gynecologist may be stressful for a young woman. The incidence of non-compliance causes an increase in the prevalence of this disease to the general population. The argument of vaccination is greatly supported behind this theory. The HPV vaccine consists of a series of three intramuscular shots given weeks to months apart. When compared to visiting for an annual gynecological check-up this alternative may be intriguing to some individuals. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) recommends all girls before they become sexually active be vaccinated against the human papillomavirus (HPV). In the summer of 2006, the FDA announces approval of a vaccine known commercially as Gardsil for the prevention of the common and potentially deadly human papillomavirus, known as HPV. The marketed “Gardasil” manufactured by Merck & Co. is known to act against the four common strands mentioned before. At the same time federal legislation has been proposing the idea to mandate that all females 11 to 12 years old should receive an HPV vaccination. The CDC endorsed this recommendation in March 2007.


* In lieu of this recommendation in 2007, the states of Texas and Virginia made quadrivalent HPV vaccine mandatory for girls entering sixth grade. However, a clause in the mandate granted parents generous “opt-out” provisions for either medical or religious beliefs. * S.B. 1416, in September 2006, Michigan was the first state to propose the legislation that girls entering 6th grade be required to receive HPV vaccine, but it was not approved.

New York:
* A 778 would require immunization against HPV to be administered to children in New York State in the same manner and according to the same time schedule that other immunizations are currently administered. (In committee 2/09) * S 1983 would require that parents and guardians of a child in New York State be encouraged, through written educational materials and consultation, to be vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV); the measure also encourages voluntary, informed vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) for adults. (Amended in committee 5/17/10) * A 5159 would ensure human papilloma vaccinations are included as a component of well-child coverage. This legislation does not mandate coverage of prescribed HPV immunizations. (In committee) * S 1905 would require insurers of cervical cancer detection to provide human papilloma virus vaccine to females ages 9 to 26. (In committee) * S 2909 /A 7489 Would require insurance companies to provide coverage for the vaccine against human papilloma...
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