How I Met Your Mother

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Ebsco Megafile
“It’s not faith in technology. It’s faith in people.” (Jobs). Technology in the twentieth century has exceeded greatly since the creation of technology and it is essential for humanity to learn these changes to their benefit. Great resources can be found in the Hennipen County Library and many other sources for databases as well. The quality of work that students get will increase greatly if they utilize these sources to their advantage. The researcher’s work will increase in efficiency as well because the non-reliable sources are eliminated when databases are used. To be able to do this, the researcher must first learn the difference between a metacrawlers and a subscription database, which can be found at the Hennipen County Library page. The researcher must then know how to utilize the Boolean logic search, the features of an “Advanced Search” on Ebsco Megafile, and perform a search using Boolean logic at the “Advanced Search” on Ebsco Megafile.

The differences between metacrawlers and subscription databases vary greatly through the number of hits, validity, and advertising. Metacrawlers create millions of hits every time the Internet user searches an item through metacrawlers such as Google or Yahoo, and the reason for this is that the information is not vetted, or investigated thoroughly to ensure trustworthiness (“Vet”). Also, when information is put in the search term on metacrawlers, the metacrawlers use keywords everywhere on the Internet for the sources that show up. Metacrawlers are paid by advertisers, so their companies are the first thing that shows up when searching a term, even if the information is not as relevant as other sources. An example of this is Wikipedia, and the reason Wikipedia does this is to make its website seem more desirable. If the researcher wants to find information on the Vietnam War, he starts by putting in “Vietnam War and history” in the search bar. When the researcher does this, 25,500,000 results are shown and the first source that is shown is “Vietnam War—History.com Articles, Video, Pictures and Facts.”, and it is a link from the website <www.history.com>. Subscription databases, on the other hand, only create hundreds or thousands of results, because they are vetted, which proves validity in the search. When databases are used, none of the searches have advertisements, so the results are not slanted. When the researcher wants to do the same search for Vietnam War, and the researcher puts the term “Vietnam War and history” in the search engine, a mere 89,165 items are shown, which is 25,410,835 less than metacrawlers using the same search terms. The first hit on Ebsco Megafile is “What Informs Teachers’ Views: The Vietnam War as a Case Study in the Era of Standardization,” and it is a link from <web.ebscohost.com>, because it is a book about the Vietnam War.

Boolean logic uses the operators “and,” “or,” and “not” to compare values and return a true or false result (“Boolean”). On Ebsco Megafile, the “Advanced Search” provides the option to utilize Boolean logic. The researcher goes to <hclib.com> in order to go to Ebsco Megafile and clicks on “Databases A-Z” on the left hand side, at the top of the website. The researcher then accesses many databases, but the one the researcher wants to use is Ebsco Megafile. When the researcher goes to this page, the owner asks for the user’s library card barcode number, so the researcher must have a Hennipen County library card. Once the researcher accesses the webpage, he then clicks on “Advanced Search” to access the Boolean logic of the database. To fully experience Boolean logic, the researcher must manipulate all of the features of Boolean logic, by using the “and,” “or” and “not” features within the Advanced Search at Ebsco Megafile. When the researcher uses the “and” feature, the hits that are shown are of the first term, the second term or of both terms. For example, utilizing “Vietnam War and...
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