How We Define the American Dream?

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How we define the American Dream?
The American Dream derives from the Declaration of Independence, which states that “all men are created equal” and they have “certain unalienable rights.” The American Dream, coined by James Adams in 1931, proposed that all citizens can live a “better, richer, and happier life.” I think President Roosevelt supports Adam’s idea of the American Dream in the speech The Four Freedoms, which he introduced the four points of freedom: Freedom of speech and expression, freedom of religion, freedom from want and freedom from fear. I think that Norman Rockwell also supports the idea of the American Dream, which he illustrates in his set of four Four Freedoms paintings inspired by President Roosevelt’s speech. I believe this traditional idea of the American Dream no longer exists in today’s society. Although Americans still fight for that dream where they have a family, worship God in their own way, express how they feel and not fear, the American Dream varies for each individual, like Gary and myself. Most citizens today do not take the time to reflect back and see how the American Dream used to be in most families. Norman Rockwell’s, “Freedom from Want” painting shows us when the ideal family meant something to the nation half a century ago. This painting shows a family who appears to be extremely happy gathered around the table for a Thanksgiving dinner. They appear to live well, like middle to upper class. Their table cloth looks impeccable, the silverware is real like sterling silver, and the turkey is larger than most of Americans have around here. I believe that there are many people who are still searching for this freedom, but in a different way. I feel everybody has their own definition of the American Dream. Personally, I would like to have finest things in life, including a family as shown in Rockwell’s painting. Looking for work is the name of a short story written by Gary Soto. Gary was born in a third generation...
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