How Video Game Violence Can Violate the Youth

Only available on StudyMode
  • Download(s) : 333
  • Published : July 27, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Running Head: VIDEO GAME VIOLENCE

Can Video Game Violence Desensitize You Without You Knowing?

David Lee Howell
June 24, 2012
COMM 3350
Mass Communications Student
University of West Georgia
Phone: 678.596.2159
E-mail: dhowell6@my.westga.edu

The most typical and asked question is what effects do video game violence have on and children and teenagers. There is such a vast selection of video game systems to choose from in the society we live in today, from Sony’s PlayStation to Nintendo’s Wii, PCs, and more. All of these mediums offer people of all ages, including children, access to interactive violent and deranged experiences. Video game violence is starting to become more common than ever while also still lurking in the shadows damaging and warping young minds. The biggest concern when it comes to video games of this nature is if having them available to younger audiences will it someday lead to real-life problems. More specifically, can and does video game violence increase aggression in young children but why is it surfacing now after video games have been available to consumers for the last 30 years. They are a unique form of entertainment, because they encourage players to become a part of a different reality. This has both positive and negative impacts on video game players. Several studies have been published that explore these impacts on today's children. Is that reality really safe one might ask, well this paper focuses on the ideas, opinions, and facts to see what steps will help you avoid video game violence brainwashing. Video games have become a part of our culture in America as well as around the world. There are a large variety of video games to be played such as sports, racing, and violent games. The most dominant type of video games that out-sells all others is the ones that include some type of violence. It is difficult to find concrete information and research that states why they outsell all the other types, but one reason may be because they allow users to turn their aggression into something simple which may result in less anger for that person. Video games have more recently started to be used as recruitment tools for branches of the United States Military with games such as “America’s Army.” One of the most popular video games of all time was Call of Duty 4: Modern Warfare Despite being one of the most violent and gruesome video games to ever be made, it sold a record number of units. There have been countless studies and research done to determine whether or not violence in video games causes aggressive / violent behavior in adolescents. It is widely disputed as to whether or not violent video games lead to aggressive behavior. Many studies have yielded mixed results. There is no consensus as to whether or not violent video games truly lead to violent behavior in the real world. One thing that many studies have noticed is the tendency for males to be more likely to play video games, specifically violent ones, than females. An adolescent male’s cultural status or personality traits will make their reaction to violent content different from one person to another. Adolescent males prefer violent video games over non-violent ones. There is a negative effect on the use of violent video games and the level of education of a male. The lower educated a male is, the more likely he is to spend more hours playing video games. This may be because having a higher education requires more time and effort, therefore reducing the amount of time in front of the television. This is when the cultivation theory switches from television to video games. When kids spend hours upon hours in front of the television playing violent video games, they may become desensitized to violence. Due to the widespread availability of video games to children nowadays, more children have become involved in violent crimes. Violent video games condone, promote, and justify the use of...
tracking img