How to Write a Term Paper.

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HOW TO WRITE A TERM PAPER.
By Mchilo, Shecland.
The University of Dodoma. Tanzania.
This guide covers what a term paper is, how to form a title for your term paper, how to decide what to put in your paper, how to conclude your paper and even how to reference your paper correctly. What is a term paper?

A term paper is a research project that you will be asked to complete at university, following the analysis of various texts and publications on a specific subject (often over the course of a term or semester, as the name suggests) as part of your course. The term paper records your research and provides you with the opportunity to convey your thoughts, findings and opinions on the material you have considered. It may be that you've been asked to write your first term paper and you're not sure where to start, or you've not studied for a while and you can't remember how best to approach the task. Alternatively, you may already be good at writing term papers but in need of a plan to speed up the process, advice on how to improve your writing skills or polish an existing piece of work. Whatever your reason for looking for information on term papers, we have put together a comprehensive set of instructions which, if followed, make writing a good term paper a simple and formulaic process. Forming a title for your term paper

You'll find that sometimes your university gives you the term paper title. In that case, you can skip this section and move on to the next stage of researching and gathering information for your term paper. If you don't yet have a title, consider this: one of the greatest flaws in students' work is that they choose a subject and then just write all they know about it. How many professional research papers have you come across in the course of your studies entitled 'Philosophy' ..'Discrimination' .. 'Restorative Justice' ..etc. Indeed, these are topics but they are just not specific enough to get a decent grade. If you want to write a good term paper, the best advice is to pose a question for your title and make sure you answer it. So how do you come up with a good question? Let's take the criminology subject of 'restorative justice' as an example. This means that rather sending people to prison, we look for ways they can 'make amends'. It's a subject on which there is a great deal of debate so it should give us some good results. You want to base your term paper on something that interests people. Current issues and debates interest people. So let's look on CNN and see what current debates have been raised about restorative justice. We get three results, two of which don't seem to relate to restorative justice and one that most definitely does. * Confronting the killer of your loved one updated Tue, July 22, 2008 - If someone brutally murdered someone you love, would you have the courage to confront them? Would you even want to? For some victims of violent crimes, these meetings are vital to the healing process. This is a great start - you could pose various questions for your term paper from this. For example: * Does restorative justice benefit the victim?

* How does restorative justice balance the needs of the victim with those of the offender? * Are violent crime offenders appropriate candidates for restorative justice? Another, indirect result of this would be:

* Why is restorative justice a more established concept in the UK than the US? (a quick search on the UK news site BBC reveals some 57 results, most of which look very relevant so this begs the question whether the views about justice are different in the States as they are in the UK)

Another place to generate ideas for a term paper title is Google itself. A quick search for the term 'restorative justice' reveals a host of information sites that will be rich in news, articles, debates and current developments - and therefore, ideas for your term paper. Researching/gathering information for your term paper

As a term...
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