How to Stop Bullying by Emily Bazelon

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Paper No:4

The pressure of racial segregation was reaching a boiling point in 1963 in Birmingham, Alabama. After being arrested for his part in the Birmingham Campaign, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. wrote an open letter in response to “A Call for Unity”, written by eight white clergymen from Birmingham. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" is a true call for unity, as he clearly states and points out facts that the clergymen have omitted from their letter. King is clearly not looking to stoke the fire of segregation; he was merely looking to solve the situation at hand and trying to peacefully end racial segregation in the United States.

In "Letter from Birmingham Jail" Martin Luther King attempts to justify the need for nonviolent direct action in order to end all forms of segregation and helping the civil rights movement. He wrote there are unjust laws and just laws. He believes segregation laws were unjust because it damages the personality and makes African American lives below the standards given to them by the Constitution. He believes just laws to be laws that are for everybody and it positively affects the group.

His Birmingham jail was an expression of his encouragement for protest against tradition and established laws and a justification for his actions. King, a leader of a civil-rights group that supported protest against traditional views, encouraged protesting Against tradition and established laws that are unjust.  In his letter from Birmingham Jail King states,

"It was illegal to aid and comfort a Jew in Hitler's Germany.  Even so, I am sure that, had I lived in Germany at that time, I would have aided and comforted my Jewish brothers.  If today I lived in a Communist country where certain Principles dear to the Christian faith are suppressed, I would openly advocate Disobeying that country's anti-religious laws."

He...
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