How to Set Up a Media Production Company

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The following report will document the formation and development of an independent production company, exploring the delegation of roles and responsibilities through a series of diagnostic tools and group evaluations. The realisation of group dynamics will also help to form a productive organisational structure and allow for any gaps in required skills sets to be identified at an early stage. This will enable prior planning and preparation to be carried out efficiently.

The portfolio will also follow the progression of the group programme idea, carefully evaluating and explaining its developments. Such developments will also help to structure the pitch and identify any weaknesses or threats facing the proposed project.

Finally, the portfolio will assess the management of the research project, and the depth of creativity and enterprise amongst the company and the idea, the report will also reflect on the success of the pitch itself in presenting to a panel of commissioning editors.

Aim and Objectives
To form an independent production company, exploring an effective management structure, alongside individual roles and responsibilities. •To pitch a programme or film concept, that demonstrates an understanding of the creative potential of television, radio or film. •To evaluate the effectiveness of such programme, the success of the group pitch and the dynamics of the production company.

Part One: Initiation

1: Group Dynamics
1.1 Skills Audits
Before group decisions could be made it was important to recognise the skill sets already present within the group, in order roles could be delegated effectively. The 2007 Learning Skills Counsel Employers survey identified the importance of recognising individual and organisational skill sets within employment. Such processes enable a company to identify their strengths and recognise skill gaps, producing either new employment opportunities for those with the ‘required’ identified skills, or a realisation of the skills that will need to be ‘brought in’. (LSC, 2007).

As an example, it was recognised that although one member of the team had experience working with creative software, their experience wasn’t advanced enough to deal with the editing software needed to complete production. It was therefore noted that these services would need to be budgeted for. The audits provided an insight into the strengths and skills gaps present within the organisation. Please see Appendix 1 – Individual Skills Audits to identify key skills

1.2 Team Roles Analysis
Secondary to the skills audit it was believed appropriate to complete an online Team roles test, the team roles test certified by (2010) is inspired by the works of Meredith Belbin (2010) and team role theories. The test itself is a common business tool, which helps to assess an individual’s behavioural tendency within a team environment. (See Appendix 2 – Team Role Analysis)

The works of Meredith Belbin note that each team should consist of different team roles, depending on the team goals and expected achievements. A team that fails to have an ideal composition is more likely to run into problems. For example, a team full of creative individuals may well be able to generate the best ideas, however none of these ideas will be implemented efficiently without a number of other team skills present.

In completing the team roles it has allowed the group to consider their strengths and identify the skills needed to complete the proposed learning outcomes. It has also helped to delegate roles and responsibilities amongst the group. The evidence represents a varied selection of roles; whilst Jemma’s analysis shows strong leadership and creative roles; Eron’s organisation, team commitment and motivational traits explore another aspect to the team. Larissa’s analysis details both the ability to stay focused and committed working best in a team but also her strong research,...
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