How to Make Swot Analysis???

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Definition
SWOT is the acronym for Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities and Threats. It is an analytical framework to help summarize in a quick and concise way the risk and opportunities for any company across the value chain. A good SWOT should look into internal and external factors affecting the issue at hand. Factors pertaining to the internal environment of the company. These are usually classified as Strengths (S) or Weaknesses (W) Factors that are external to the company. These are classified as Opportunities (O) or Threats (T). A SWOT analysis helps you match your company’s resources and capabilities to threats and opportunities in the competitive environment. SWOT analysis can be very subjective, but adding weighting and criteria to each factor increases the validity of the analysis. Finally, a SWOT (or TOWS)matrix can help pick the best strategy to implement and takes the SWOT analysis to the next step. See our SWOT matrix below . Structure of a SWOT analysis

A SWOT analysis is typically represented by a 4-box model that lists the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats in the following order: StrengthsWeaknesses
OpportunitiesThreats
As you can see the beauty of a SWOT framework lies in its simplicity. Why use a SWOT analysis?
Methodically and honestly assessing your company’s strengths and weaknesses as well as the opportunities and threats it faces gives you a rare opportunity for objective analysis. A SWOT: Is easy to use

Combines quantitative and qualitative analysis
Encourages interdepartmental collaboration
To make sure your analysis is put to good use, include these before and after steps in your analysis process: Set an objective for the analysis
Set aside adequate time for research and information-gathering Evaluate the results of your analysis against your original objective This competitive analysis tool guides you through the SWOT technique and will help you create your own analysis that can help you set a strategic plan or present new ideas to your team. Conducting a SWOT analysis

There are eight steps required to complete a SWOT analysis and create a SWOT matrix (also known as a TOWS matrix). List external opportunities
List external threats
List internal strengths
List internal weaknesses
At this point in the process, you’ll have a significant list of potential strategies. You’ll need to weigh the impact of the various factors in your analysis and select the most feasible strategy to implement. Ideally, you’ll select a SO strategy, but often you’ll need to implement one of the other three types of strategies to overcome a weakness or address a threat before being in a position to implement a S-O strategy. Questions that a SWOT Analysis Should Answer

Here are some questions to help you understand the type of concepts a SWOT should be able to answer. This is list is by no means exhaustive, but will hopefully provide you with some guidance in your endeavors. Strenghts

Advantages of proposition?
Capabilities?
Competitive advantages?
USP's (unique selling points)?
Resources, Assets, People?
Experience, knowledge, data?
Financial reserves, likely returns?
Marketing - reach, distribution, awareness?
Innovative aspects?
Location and geographical?
Price, value, quality?
Accreditations, qualifications, certifications?
Processes, systems, IT, communications?
Cultural, attitudinal, behavioural?
Management cover, succession?
Philosophy and values?

Weaknesses
Disadvantages of proposition?
Gaps in capabilities?
Lack of competitive strength?
Reputation, presence and reach?
Financials?
Own known vulnerabilities?
Timescales, deadlines and pressures?
Cashflow, start-up cash-drain?
Continuity, supply chain robustness?
Effects on core activities, distraction?
Reliability of data, plan predictability?
Morale, commitment, leadership?
Accreditations, etc?...
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