How to Become a Lawyer

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  • Topic: Lawyer, Law School Admission Test, Bar association
  • Pages : 6 (2247 words )
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  • Published : March 27, 2013
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Gregory Lorraine
Professor DellaPenna
11/24/12
Research Paper

Lawyers; The Myths and Truths of Becoming an Attorney

Our society today puts a few above the many; in this case we put certain positions or jobs on a hypothetical pedestal. This is not to say that these idealized positions of what we perceive to be power are not important or are easy to attain. To get to these positions requires an enormous amount of work and dedication. The positions I speak of specifically are the attorneys who practice law in our country. Lawyers or Attorneys are the people who as my father once said “Run the World”, of course he did not mean this literally however what he said struck a chord in me, and subsequently I am writing a paper on how to become one. The first thing that must be taken into account when trying to become a lawyer is yourself, becoming a lawyer is a difficult task and while it may pay off in the long haul you must ask yourself why you are doing it. If money is the main factor that motivates you to become a lawyer my advice would be to choose another career. Being a lawyer is a lot of work once you are licensed not to mention the effort you must put in to even be a candidate for the bar association. “The median annual wage of lawyers was $112,760 in May 2010.” (Bureau of Labor Statistics,2012). This in comparison to the median wage of our country for all jobs a lot of money almost 80,000 dollars to be precise. “Salaries of experienced lawyers vary widely according to the type, size, and location of their employer. Lawyers who own their own practices usually earn less than those who are partners in law firms.”( Bureau of Labor Statistics,2012) Knowing that you have a choice to make between the probable amount of money you can make, or do you want to be your own boss.

The very first thing you do when pursuing a career such as this is to commit to it. If you want to be a good attorney and not just a hack you have to commit yourself to the law if you want to be good at it you have to believe in what you do. If you want to be a District attorney for example, it would be counterproductive were people to discover that you do not believe in the laws you strive to protect. Now that is just a mental step or decision really, and once it is complete which for most of you reading this paper it should be you can begin your journey to become a lawyer. The next and first difficult decision is to decide what you want to major in for your undergraduate education, while it is a general assumption that you would major in prelaw studies, my advice will be the opposite. The last thing I would advise a student to do is pursue what many scholars believe to be a useless degree. The following numbers are the current unemployment rates of college graduates with a degree in certain areas. “17 Studio art 8.0%;18 Pre-law & legal studies 7.9%; 7.7% 20. Liberal arts 7.6%.” (O'SHAUGHNESSY,2011) You may notice that out of the 173 majors looked at a prelaw major is one of the top twenty, meaning that this degree is one of the least employable choices. My advice and my personal plan is to get a degree in something that I or you could get a job with should law school fall through, you must always plan for the possibility that at some point along the way you will no longer want to pursue a career as a lawyer. For me this means a bachelors in Mechanical Engineering for you could mean a number of things. The greatest myth or misconception about becoming a lawyer is that you should major in prelaw. This is false because doing well in a major with substance and even different material will show the law schools you are applying to that you have a good work ethic and are intelligent. This combined with a high LSAT score and a good GPA will be more than enough to get you into good law school.

“Many law schools, particularly those approved by the ABA, also require applicants to take the Law School Admission Test (LSAT), a test that measures...
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