How They Forecast a Cold Winter

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A narrative (or story) is any account that presents connected events,[1] and may be organized into various categories: non-fiction (e.g. New Journalism, creative non-fiction, biographies, and historiography); fictionalized accounts of historical events (e.g. anecdotes, myths, and legends); and fiction proper (i.e. literature in prose, such as short stories and novels, and sometimes in poetry and drama, although in drama the events are primarily being shown instead of told). Narrative is found in all forms of human creativity and art, including speech, writing, songs, film, television, video games, photography, theatre, and visual arts such as painting, with the modern art movements refusing the narrative in favour of the abstract and conceptual) that describes a sequence of events. The word derives from the Latin verb narrate, "to tell", and is related to the adjective gnarls, "knowing" or "skilled".[2] The word "story" may be used as a synonym of "narrative". It can also be used to refer to the sequence of events described in a narrative. Narratives may also be nested within other narratives, such as narratives told by unreliable narrator (a character) typically found in noir fiction genre. An important part of narration is the narrative mode, the set of methods used to communicate the narrative through a process narration (see also "Narrative Aesthetics" below). Along with exposition, argumentation, and description, narration, broadly defined, is one of four rhetorical modes of discourse. More narrowly defined, it is the fiction-writing mode whereby the narrator communicates directly to the reader.

Noun

1. A story or account of events, experiences, or the like, whether true or fictitious. 2. A book, literary work, etc., containing such a story. 3.The art, technique, or process of narrating: Somerset Maugham was a master of  narrative.

Adjective

4. Consisting of or being a narrative: a narrative poem. 5. Of or pertaining to narration: narrative skill.
6.Fine Arts. Representing stories or events pictorially or sculpturally: narrative painting.  Compare anecdotal 

Narrative in a History of Greeks in the US Written for Young Readers   from "West of Atlantis"  
The Greeks in America
The first sizable settlement of Greeks in America took place in 1767, under rather unusual circumstances. Florida had become a British colony in 1763. An enterprising Scottish doctor named Andrew Turnbull obtained permission from the governor of Florida to work 20,000 acres of uncultivated land near St. Augustine. Under the terms of his contract with the government, Turnbull was to bring only Protestants to Florida. (The Orthodox Greek Christians qualified.)  Turnbull's wife was the daughter of a Greek general from Smyrna, and Turnbull himself was familiar with the Mediterranean area. He collected, as settlers to work his land, destitute and desperate people from Greece, Italy, Corsica, and Majorca. To induce them to come with him, he described Florida as a paradise and promised to make them landowners. He agreed to supply them with passage, food, and clothing for three years-and return passage if they wanted to leave after six months' trial. In addition, he agreed to give each family 50 acres of land and an additional 25 acres for each child in the family. He brought about 1,400 men, women, and children to the settlement, which he named New Smyrna in honour of his wife's home.  The voyage was terribly hard and many of the colonists died at sea, but even worse conditions awaited them in Florida. Instead of working in vineyards and olive groves as they had been led to expect, they found themselves cultivating cotton in swampy, malaria-infested bottomlands and being harassed by hostile Native Americans. Furthermore, their work was directed by English overseers who knew none of the languages spoken by the colonists and who treated them cruelly.

Drama is the...
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