How Society Views Children with Adhd

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HOW SOCIETY VIEWS CHILDREN WITH
ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER

I. Society Views

A. Society Views on Children with ADHD
B. How Society Affects the Development of the ADHD Child
1.Mental development
2.Physical development
3. Social development

II. Diagnosis

A.Reasons for Seeking Professional Diagnosis
B.How the Diagnosis is Made
C.Why the Diagnosis can be Incorrect

III. Treatment

A.Ritalin
B.Modern Therapy
1.Herbal Therapy
2.Mental Therapy
3.Diet Therapy

HOW SOCIETY VIEWS CHILDREN WITH
ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER

Andrew Todd

English III

April 24, 2001

WORKS CITED

Aronwitz, Robert, Making Sense of Illness: Science, Society, and Disease. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University, Press 1998.

Hartman, Thom, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, A Different Perception. Grass Valley: Mythical Intelligence, Inc. 1997

Infotrac, From Hyperactive Children to ADHD Adults: Observations on the Expansion of Medical Categories. Conrad, Peter and Deborah Potter, "Social Problems", November 2000, http://web2.infotrac.galegroup.com

Kelly, Kate and Peggy Ramundo, You Mean I'm Not Crazy, Lazy, Dumb or Stupid! A Self-Help Book for Adults and Children with ADHD, Cincinnati: Tyrell and Jerem; Press, 1993.

Dr. Rufus McPhail Herring, Personal Interview, Monday, March 26th 2001.

HOW SOCIETY VIEWS CHILDREN WITH
ATTENTION DEFICIT HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER

When you hear someone say Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, a mental challenge, or ADHD what is the first thing you think? Do you think that person is lazy, dumb, crazy, or just plain stupid? ADHD is a mental challenge and we do not know what causes it, but we have formulated drugs that help to control the changes in behavior. Many people believe that ADHD is a behavior problem that can be "cured" with spanking and strict discipline. ADHD is not a behavior problem; it is a mental challenge, ADHD can be treated with the drug Methylphenidate, better known as Ritalin. Most people do not know how to detect ADHD, but with help from a book, ADHD: A Different Perception by Thom Hartman, one can read many ways to self-diagnose ADHD. In his book, Hartman gives many characteristics of ADHD. Many of these characteristics deal with attention span. The following is a list of the characteristics defined in his book: •Easily distracted

•Short but very intense attention spans
•Disorganization, with snap decisions
•Distortions of time sense
•Difficulty following directions
•Exhibit symptoms of depression
•Take extreme risks
•Easily frustrated and impatient
•Sense of underachievement
•Difficulty getting organized
•Chronic procrastination
•Many projects going on all at once with trouble following through •Tendency to say what comes to mind
•Resistive search for high stimulation
•Easily bored
•Trouble focusing
•Creative, intuitive, highly intelligent
•Trouble following proper procedure
•Impulsive action verbally or physically
•Tendency to worry needlessly
•Tendency to scan the horizon looking for something to worry about •Alternating from one task to another
•Sense of impending doom, insecure
•Mood swings, depression, especially when disengaged from a personal project •Tendency to have an addictive behavior
•Chronic self esteem problems
•Inaccurate self observation
•Family history of ADD or manic depression illness
•More likely to abuse substance

These characteristics are all incorporated in the self-diagnosis of ADD (Attention Deficit Disorder) and ADHD. The American Psychiatric Associations/ DSM III-R defined a person having ADHD if they meet eight or more of these characteristics. Test yourself. If you express eight or more of these qualities you could be ADHD: 1.When required to remain seated the person has difficulty doing so. 2.Stimuli extraneous to the task at...
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