How Infertility Effects Marriage

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  • Topic: Fertility, Infertility, Assisted reproductive technology
  • Pages : 6 (1878 words )
  • Download(s) : 355
  • Published : December 6, 2012
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Nakia Collins
Professor Cooke
Enc 1101
29 November 2012
Infertility and Its Effect on Marriage

Introduction
“Infertility refers to the failure to conceive after having regular sex without using any protection. It also refers to the inability of a person to add to conception, or to a female who cannot carry a pregnancy to full term” (American pregnancy association). In some countries it refers to couples who have been unsuccessful at conceiving after a year of regular sex without using any protection. It is a general assumption that infertility is mainly connected to the female. In actuality, only one-third of infertility cases are connected to the female alone. Statistically, one-third of infertility troubles are connected to men and the remaining one-third is a mixture of fertility factors concerning either partner or unidentified causes. Unknown causes account for roughly twenty percent of infertility cases (American pregnancy association). Conception and pregnancy are complex methods that depend on a number of factors, including: 1) the creation of healthy sperm by the male, 2) healthy eggs created by the female; 3) unclogged fallopian tubes that let the sperm get to the egg; 4) the capability of the sperm to fertilize the egg when they meet up; 5) the capability of the fertilized egg to become set in the female's uterus; and, 6) adequate embryo quality. This paper is going to look at the long-term impact of infertility on marriage. Attention will be given to what would be called healthy marriages in which the couples had not wanted counseling for their marriage, had not considered divorce or separation, and showed reasonable attitudes about the hope of having a child and its role in making their marriage unwavering. Attention will also be given to those in unhealthy marriages distinguished by anticipated separation and an unhealthy stance towards children and a child’s ability to mend their marriage. What Causes Infertility

Infertility can involve both male and female. A common cause of male infertility is when no sperm cells are created or when hardly any sperm cells are created. Sometimes, sperm cells are abnormal or they die prior to getting to the egg. Infertility in a male is caused by a genetic disease. For males with low sperm count, supplements exist that can develop sperm. A common cause of female infertility is an ovulation condition. Troubles with ovulation have an effect on about 25% of all infertility situations. Additional causes for female infertility consist of “blocked fallopian tubes, which can occur when a female has had pelvic inflammatory disease or endometriosis; birth defects concerning the makeup of the uterus, and uterine fibroids which are linked to recurring miscarriages”; and getting old, since the ability for ovaries to make eggs have a tendency to go down with age, particularly after age 35 ("American pregnancy association").

“In the medical field, a risk factor is something that increases the likelihood of developing a disease or symptom. There are risk factors that have been found to contribute to infertility: age, smoking, alcohol consumption, being overweight, eating disorders, being vegan, over exercising, not exercising, STDs, exposure to chemicals, and stress” (Nordqvist). A female's fertility usually begins to fall after age 32, and continues. A male age 50 is probably less fertile than a 20 year old male. Smoking considerably boosts the threat of infertility in males and females. Smoking could furthermore weaken the outcome of fertility treatment. When a female becomes pregnant, the threat of miscarriage is increased if she smokes. A female's pregnancy can be gravely influenced by the use of alcohol. Alcohol abuse can potentially decrease male productiveness. Reasonable alcohol use has not had proven results showing a decrease in the fertility in males, but is believed to decrease fertility in those with low sperm counts. In developed...
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