How Has Huck Changed

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Cesar Luengas
period 1
Huck Changed

In the beginning novel, Huck struggles against society and its attempts to civilize himself, which was represented by the Widow Douglas, Miss Watson, and other adults. Later, this conflict gains more focus in Huck’s dealings with Jim, as Huck must decide whether to turn Jim in, as society demands, or to protect and help his friend instead. The most significant way in which Huck changes his attitude is with Jim, by excepting him as a person. Towards the end of chapter 15, Huck plays a trick on Jim when they got separated in the fog. Huck tries to convince Jim that he's been drinking because when they found each other, Huck explains he's never gone anywhere, he's been by his side the whole time. Then Huck goes off saying, “Well, this is too many for me, Jim. I hain't see fog, nor no islands nor no troubles... You couldn't 'a' got drunk in that time, so of course you've been dreaming.” (84) Jim at this point is confused because how can he dream all that in ten minutes. Later on, as Huck realizes that lying to Jim about that whole incident was wrong of him, he apologizes to him. It was quite a thing for a white person to apologize to a black person in that time so it show that he is growing emotions towards Jim. He realizes why lie to him if colored people get taken advantage of all the time, Huck didn’t want to be one of those white people who did. More important, he eventually takes charge and tells the truth no matter what the outcome is, and has changed from a juvenile boy who doesn't care if others are tricked, to a more civilized boy who protects innocent people.
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