How Far Were the Big Three Pleased with the Treaty of Versailles

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The Treaty of Versailles was signed in Paris, at the Palace of Versailles. The three main representatives were Clemenceau, Lloyd-George and Wilson, and these became known as ‘the Big Three’. Clemenceau represented France, and, voted for by the public, had to please those who supported him. So in a country that had lost so much, he wanted to get all he could from Germany to satisfy the angry nation and make them as weak as possible to protect France in the future. Lloyd-George was Great Britain’s representative, and after winning an election in December 1918 and promising to make Germany pay, he was split in half. On one hand, he should comply with the wishes of his country and keep his promise to the public, by forcing Germany to pay and suffer, but on the other hand, he wanted to let Germany off relatively easy as he knew they were a big trading partner and so without them Britain would suffer. Wilson, however, wasn’t interested in Germany’s punishment; he was set on the idea of world peace, and did not believe this could be achieved by threatening and reproving Germany. The German’s were allowed representatives at the conferences, but they were not allowed to have any say in what was discussed. They had to sit and listen to their fate being decided for them. So, inevitably, deciding on the term of the Treaty were a long, difficult and drawn out process due to the conflicting opinions. Once the Treaty was decided, there were still conflicting emotions and there were still issues where each of the Big Three hadn’t got exactly what they wanted. Wilson was pleased that his idea of The League of Nations was put into action, because he felt this was one step closer to world peace. However, he still felt Germany needed to be punished, so he was happy when Germany was forced to accept war guilt, despite the fact that this annoyed the Germans, as they felt the war was not solely their fault. Although there was a point to the treaty Wilson was pleased with, he was...
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