How Does the Poet Effectively Create a Sense of Horror and Futility of War?

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How does the poet effectively create a sense of horror and futility of war? Wilfred Owens “Dulce et decorum est” tell us about the terrible and dreadful description suffered by a group of soldiers in the First World who gladly laid down their lives in the glory of battle. Dulce et decorum est, a very popular propaganda and a big lie which tells us that how sweet and fitting is to die for ones country. This poem is written in horrifying of how soldiers died to make the readers think that it is not sweet and fitting to die for ones country. Wilfred Owen thinks that fighting in a war can be a terrible experience. His dramatic descriptions, tone of desperation, using images of pain and sorrow and his unique rhythms seek to convince us the horror and terror of those who went through the war. His use of techniques helps us understand his point of view, displaying the horrors of fighting the war. This poem tell us that how it is an honour to die for your country yet also the horrors of fighting the war. In the first stanza, Wilfred Owen have used of figurative language like alliteration, onomatopoeia, metaphors and loads of similes. He have used words like….”Bent beggars”, “knocked knees”, “hags”, all these powerful figurative words creates an image to produce a pitiful sense of despair “……….coughing like old hags” Wilfred Owen uses simile which effectively creates a scene of terrible situation. Coughing suggests that the soldiers are tired and sick. Wilfred Owen tries the reader to feel sorry and pity because winning the war at that moment is hopeless. Men were tired in the war, it brought to a level of hags and beggars. The sentence…..”Men marched asleep” the three bold words imitate the scene of exhausted men, where they all went lame and blind. The term "blood-shod" not only describes the men's feet covered in blood but brings to mind connotations of blood-shot and blood-shed, phrases that aptly describe the situation.  "Gas! Gas! Quick, boys!”, Owen uses an...
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