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How Does Shakespeare Present the Characters Macbeth and Lady Macbeth?

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How Does Shakespeare Present the Characters Macbeth and Lady Macbeth?

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  • March 28, 2012
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How does Shakespeare present the characters of Macbeth and Lady Macbeth in Act 1? Macbeth is a dramatic play which tells the story of the downfall of a ‘Nobleman’ who becomes a ‘tyrant’. In Act one Shakespeare introduces the characters Macbeth and Lady Macbeth using a range of dramatic devices. At the start of the play Macbeth is introduced from two different perspectives. He is firstly introduced by the three witches whom are discussing a meeting with him ‘There to meet with Macbeth’. This scene would create immense tension for the audience as the presence of the witches in the play would indicate a series of evil and sinister events occurring later on in the play. King James I was also afraid of witches so this scene would tense the audience even more. Shakespeare uses the supernatural beliefs of the people during that era as it created a dramatic atmosphere and it helped indicate that the plot of the story was going to be full of conspiracies and murder. It also implies that the main character Macbeth is going to be a character which becomes influenced by evil forces. The first scene is set in a battlefield which creates an eerie atmosphere as it links to the prospect of death and danger. The mood of the play is set in the first scene creating suspense and curiosity for the audience. Macbeth is then introduced again in the play by the Captain, whom is talking to King Duncan, in Act 1 Scene 2 as ‘Brave Macbeth’. We are told that ‘His brandish’d steel

smok’d with bloody execution.’
This gives the audience another impression about Macbeth that he is a respected man as he is being talked about by the king. Macbeth is also talked about by Ross who describes him as ‘Bellona’s bridegroom, lapp’d in proof,’ looking like the Roman Goddess of war’s husband, covered in strong armour. Shakespeare uses roman beliefs to introduce Macbeth as a brave and successful warrior as he is being called the Roman Goddess of wars husband.

Macbeth is physically introduced...