How Do the Poems Reveal the Poet’s Attitude to War?

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How do the poems reveal the poet’s attitude to war?

In our anthologies we have had a choice of many different poems, and they where all about either people in the war or what has happened afterwards. I have chosen these five poems to write about:

The Charge of the Light Brigade
Disabled
In Flanders Field
The Man He Killed
Dulce Et Decorum Est

In each poem I will look at the effects in each poem such as rhythm, alliteration and many others. Also I will write what I think the poems are about, and what I think some parts of them mean, and also how they affect me as a reader.

The Charge of the Light Brigade

The first poem I am writing about is ‘The Charge of the Light Brigade’ written by Lord Alfred Tennyson. It is about the battle of Balaclava, where six hundred men rode into battle and only two hundred came back out alive.

I noticed that the rhythm of the poem is fast, like the feet of running horses ‘Forward, the Light Brigade!’. This makes you feel like you’re actually there with them, it makes you feel excited but then as they ride into battle the reality hits and they realise they are riding into death.

I also noticed that the author uses a lot of repetition like when he says ‘Half a league‘. He mentions this quite a lot in the poem and I think it shows how far the men go into battle and also I think it makes you feel like you’re going with them. When he uses ‘cannon’ it shows how they were surrounded by the cannons with no way out. I think this shows a lot of pity because this was the main reason why so many of the men died.

He uses alliteration too. In the part of the poem where it says ‘sabre stroke shatter’d and sunder’d’ its effective in the way that it makes all the s’ sound like the bullets of the guns whizzing past the soldiers ears.

He uses many words that make you feel pity like ‘death’ this because nobody wants to die and also they were so young you feel sorry for them because they missed out on so much, ‘hell’ because hell sounds and is such a horrible place, ‘guns’ because they must have been so scared that they were going to get killed by them, ‘die’ because no-one ever wants to die, and also ‘shot’ because they must have been really scared because so many people had been shot and got wounded it could happen to all of them.

Disabled

The next poem I will be writing about is called ‘Disabled’ this was written by Wilfred Owen. This poem is all about a boy who lied about his age and signed up to join the army, he ends up getting all his limbs lost and he is sitting in his wheelchair in hospital, thinking of all the things he wont be able to do anymore, or what he wont have the chance to do.

I found this poem quite upsetting yet also I found it annoying, because he was only young and he lied because he thought that it would be fun and that he would be able to wear great uniforms and get many girls to like him but instead he got the opposite in the way that he ended up losing his arms and his legs which made girls not like him. On the other hand I think that in a way he deserved it, well not to that extent but because the only reason he joined in the first place was for him, he was only thinking about himself and not thinking of helping his country or any of the people in it.

In Flanders Fields

Now I will be writing about the poem ‘In Flanders Field’ and this was written by John McCrae. In this poem it is about all of the men that went to war and died in Flanders fields and how they are there and will be forever.

This poem is set out in three verses and at the end of the last two they both say ‘In Flanders fields.’ I think the author used this structure because each verse has a different topic or meaning.

The poem does rhyme and has some rhyming couplets like ‘blow, row’ and ‘sky, fly.’ These are a good thing to have because they give the poem rhythm. The poem’s rhythm is slow and constant all the way through. The poem mentions ‘the crosses, row on...
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