How Do the Poems Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Dulce Et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen Present Attitudes to Warfare?

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How do the poems Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen present attitudes to warfare? Throughout the history of mankind warfare has played an important part in shaping the world as it is today. The poems- The Charge of the light brigade by Alfred, Lord Tennyson and Dulce et Decorum Est by Wilfred Owen show contrasting views toward war. The Charge of the light Brigade shows glorified attitudes towards battle; however Dulce et Decorum Est shares the authors views on the vileness of war. Bringing up quotes such as “The old lie: Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori which translates to-It is sweet and noble to die for your country” A patriotic quote that is commonly used throughout the world that is viewed by many as a complete fabrication and could be described as imperialistic propaganda.

Although both 'Dulce et Decorum Est´ and 'The Charge of the Light Brigade´ are about battle and the death of soldiers, they both portray the experience of war in very different ways. The Charge of the Light Brigade tells us of the glory of war, despite the fact that, six hundred soldiers were sent to their death. On the other hand, Dulce et Decorum Est, might almost have been written as a challenge to Tennyson´s patriotic views of battle. He presents the horror of senseless death in the trenches and shows the saying, “it is sweet and becoming to die for your country”, is a lie.

We are told that Tennyson wrote 'Light Brigade´ in a few minutes after reading the description in The Times of the Battle of Balaclava in 1854. He was a civilian poet, unlike a soldier poet like Owen. His poem 'Light Brigade´ increased the morale of the British soldiers fighting in the Crimean War and of the people at home, but Tennyson had not been an eyewitness to the battle he describes so he would have no idea of what it felt like.

Wilfred Owen wrote 'Dulce et Decorum Est´ towards the end of the First World War. He was killed in action a...
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