How Do the Features Od the Wag Water River Change Down Strea,

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AIM OF STUDY

The purpose of this study is to identify how the velocity changed from the upper course to the lower course, how the channel structure changes from the upper course to the lower course, what features are formed at various stages of the river, what are the changes in the sediments found in and around the channel and how mans interference has affected the water flow.

Methodology

On June 6, 2012 a group of students from Kingston College went on a field trip to study the Wag Water River. Four stops were studied on the field trip but only three will be used in this S.B.A. The three stops that will be studied are the upper course located in Golden Spring, the middle course located in Castleton and the lower course located in Broadgate. The velocity was calculated at each course by taking the time it took a float to travel a 10 metre distance, this was done six times and then the average was calculated. Fifty random stone were collected at each stop. A tape measure was used to measure the long axis of each sediment particle. This was done because if particular size sediments are found in abundance it means they are too heavy for the river to carry so it is deposited. The width of the river was recorded at the upper and middle course using a tape measure. The width of the lower course was unable to be recorded because of dangerous waters. The depths of the upper, middle and lower courses were recorded by using a yard ruler. The depths were tested in the west bank, east bank and the centre of the course.

Upper Course (Golden Spring)

The first stop of the trip was the upper course located in Golden Spring. Upon arrival the first order of business was to test the velocity of the river. Two poles were placed 10 metres apart from each other, then the available stop watches set to zero. A bottle float was held at the first pole then was released at the same time the stop watch was started. The stop watch was later stopped when the float passed the second pole. This process was repeated five times after which the average time the bottle float took to cover the 10 metres was calculated then the speed of the bottle was calculated. Secondly A tape measure was used to measure the course. The tape measure was placed at the west bank and stretched across to the east bank. Thirdly 50 random rocks were collected and measured to see at what size the river were unable to transport. Lastly a yard stick was used to measure the depth of the different sections of the course.

Table 1 Showing The Velocity Data Collected Along The Wag Water River At Site 1 (Golden Spring) Distance | Time (in sec.)| Velocity |
10| 23.15| 0.43|
10| 22.30| 0.45|
10| 21.29| 0.47|
10| 21.44| 0.47|
10| 22.58| 0.44|
10| 23.12| 0.43|
Average | 22.31| 0.45|

Table Showing Depths and Width of Data For Channel At Site 1 Width of Channel| 19.69|
Depth of West Bank| 0.23|
Depth of East Bank| 0.18|
Depth of Centre| _|

Features Noted
Braiding – Braiding was seen in this stage of the river. The width of the braiding found was 5.6 metres wide Ait - The Aits in this section of the river consisted of small pebbles deposited by the river and were small in size. The width of the Ait was found to be 7.13 metres wide while the length was 23.6 metres long. Thalweg – The Thalweg was located on the west bank of the channel. Interlocking Spurs - The Interlocking Spurs were located further up the river near where dormant waterfalls were.

Sketch of The Channel
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Middle Course (Castleton)

The second stop of the trip was the middle course located in Castleton. Right away there was an obvious difference in the features of the course. The

sediments were now boulders instead of small sediments; there was more water because of tributaries that joined the main river between the upper and middle course. The velocity,...
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