How Do Teenagers Spend Their Days?

Only available on StudyMode
  • Topic: Sociology, 1921, 1923
  • Pages : 7 (1664 words )
  • Download(s) : 3526
  • Published : February 14, 2012
Open Document
Text Preview
Component of Statistics Canada Catalogue no. 89-630-X Matter of Fact

Article
How do teenagers spend their days?

by Kirstin Haley
September 2008

The population studiedGeneralreport is the non-institutionalized population of 15 to 19 year olds living in the 10 provinces. The in this Social Survey The Aussi disponible en français data from 1992, 1998 and 2005 were collected over 12 months of the survey year, whereas in 1986 data were only collected for two months (November and December) of the survey year. 1

Matter of Fact
Statistics Canada – Catalogue no. 89-630-X

No.

Celebrating 20 years

8

Canada’s General Social Survey has been gathering information for 20 years on key social issues in Canadian society.

The Matter of Fact series highlights important insights into changes in Canadian society over the past two decades, following the theme, “Without the General Social Survey, we would still be wondering . . .”

By Kirstin Haley

How do teenagers spend their days?
Teenagers are not sitting in front of the television all day, but they are keeping busy at other activities! The General Social Survey (GSS) collected time use data in 1986, 1992, 1998 and 2005. Time-use data examines time use over a 24 hour period on a diary day. The analysis in this fact sheet looks at time use by participation rate (number of people reporting an activity) and by the number of minutes spent on an activity1. The data show that teenagers2 aged 15 to 19 were spending less time in front of the television but were spending more time working at a paid job and using the Internet in 2005. Among teenagers aged 15 to 19 years old the percentage watching television has decreased over the last 20 years. About 75% of teenagers in 1986 watched television, compared to 71% in 2005. For almost all other age groups television watching has more or less stayed the same. In 1986, 15 to 19 year old boys watched an average of 3.2 hours of television a day and girls in the same age group watched 2.8 hours. In 2005, teenaged boys watched an average of 2.6 hours of television a day and girls watched 2.2 hours. Chart 1 Decline in watching television for teens, 15 to 19 years old, 1986, 1992, 1998 and 2005

3.5 3.0 2.5 2.0 1.5 1.0 0.5 0.0 2.8

3.2 2.6

3.2 2.7 2.7 2.2 2.6

What else are teenagers doing with their time then? Teenagers worked, with 29% of boys and 26% of girls working during the week, in 2005. There has been a steady increase in the number of girls working at paid jobs on the weekends. While 31% of girls worked on weekends in 2005, only 20% did so in 1986. However, in 2005 girls and boys who worked at a paid job worked virtually the same number of hours on the reference day (6 hours) compared to 5 hours in 1986. Girls reported spending more time studying than boys in 2005. Participation in, and time spent on homework is affected by cultural backgrounds, family types and education levels of parents. Teens with

number of hours

1986

1992 Female

1998 Male

2005

Source: Statistics Canada, General Social Survey

1. Average hours are for all Canadians 15 to 19 years old averaged over a seven-day week. 2. The population studied in this report is the population of 15 to 19 year old living in private households in the 10 provinces. The data from 1992, 1998 and 2005 were collected over 12 months of the survey year, whereas in 1986 data were only collected for two months (November and December) of the survey year.

1

The General Social Survey Statistics Canada – Catalogue no. 89-630-X

Matter of Fact
No. 8

immigrant parents, teens that come from a two parent intact family (never divorced parents) and teens whose parents both have a university education were likely to spend more time doing homework than others. Also, teens with a demanding job (20 + hours a week) spent significantly less time on homework than those not employed3. Chart 2 Girls reported spending more time doing homework than do boys...
tracking img