How Do Parents Influence Child Development

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How do parents influence child development?
Parents play a significant role in influencing their child’s development. Were you ever curious why you act the way you do? Why did you turn out the way you did? There are many factors that affect a child’s development. One being the attachment the child received during infancy, whether the child had a secure or unsecured bond with their parent. The second element is the types of parenting styles used while the child was developing. There are three components: authoritarian, permissive and authoritative. These two factors affect the child’s behavior. Parents influence their child’s development by the nature of attachment given during infancy; parenting styles used thus affecting their behavior. Has anyone ever told you that if a parent always picks up their baby the child too much the child will be spoiled? When my son was first born, I remember my mother telling me to stop picking him up. I asked “Why?” and she replied because if you keep doing it then he will be spoiled and think that every time he cries you will come running. On the contrary, research shows that the more responsive you are to an infant’s needs and wants the child will be less spoiled as the child gets older. (Bonding with Your Baby) “Attachment is a special emotional relationship that involves an exchange of comfort, care, and pleasure”. (Cherry) “This relationship brings both parties together by ensuring that the need of the child is met. The attachment bond is the deep, lasting relationship that develops between you and your baby in the first few years of life. This bonding creates a unique relationship that shapes your baby's development. It motivates you to pay close attention to your baby’s needs—to get up in the middle of the night for feeding, to notice when a diaper needs changing, and to understand what your baby’s different cries mean”. (Parenting Advice for Developing a Secure Attachment Bond) Most people do not understand that the bond between a parent and child has an everlasting impact on a child’s life. This unique relationship is created during the first couple years of the child’s life. This exclusive and everlasting relationship shapes the child’s development. The bonding process happens naturally as parents care for their baby. “In the 1990’s an explosion of learning uncovered the fact that this unique relationship, the attachment bond, is a key factor in your infant’s social, emotional, intellectual and physical development”. (Bonding with Your Baby) Dr. Bobby Sura, a clinical psychologist, chartered with the British Psychological Society emphasis on attachment between child and parent is important for providing the foundation of emotional security. Researcher Diana Baumrind identified three styles of parenting: authoritarian, permissive and authoritative. Authoritarian parents enforce rules also require obedience. This style of parenting is like “military style”. Lisa Jones, she was raised in an authoritarian household. She explains that when she was growing up her parents were extremely strict. They had many chores and very little privileges. Authoritarian parents hold their children to very high standards of achievement. Their desire for discipline is paramount, in this relationship there are low levels of love, nurturing and affection. (Duane, Grusec) Needless to say, authoritarian parents do not love their children but expressive it in a different way. Many children from this type of parenting have in equate success with love. (Authoritarian Parenting: An Overview) Permissive parents submit to their children’s desires. They have few demands and use very little discipline. When most people think about permissive parenting, they associate it with the child being in charge. Nicki Bradley, a writer for Parenting Magazine wrote “Permissive parents believe that showing their child love and feeling loved, in return, is the ultimate goal in parenting. Permissive parents tend to avoid...
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