How Do Ethics Influence Public Policy?

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How do Ethics Influence Public Policy?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
LaShan Lewis
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
- PAD 510
Instructor: Dr.
Date- March 13, 2011

Table of Contents
Abstract…………………………………………………………………………3 Chapter 1: Introduction…………………………………………………………4 Main Research Question and Sub-Questions…………………………………...6 Significance of the Study……………………………………………………....7 Research Design and Methodology…………………………………………....7 Limitation of the Study……………………………………………………….12 Organization of the Study…………………………………………………….12 CHAPTER 2: Review of Literature………………………………………….13 References…………………………………………………………………….14

Abstract
Ethics is the branch of philosophy dealing with values relating to human conduct, with respect to the rightness and wrongness of certain actions and to the goodness and badness of the motives and ends of such actions. The field of ethics (or moral philosophy) involves systematizing, defending, and recommending concepts of right and wrong behavior (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/ethics). Ethics exists everywhere whether it is in government or non-government agencies.

Careerists can provide inputs to the policy process that differ from the contributions of elected officials. Those inputs may take the form of special knowledge passed to elected officials in a particular policy area. They may also involve representation of concerns to elected decisionmakers on behalf of interest groups, which – though their views are important and their stake in the controversy is great – might not be heard in the normal pull and haul of interest group politics. An aspect of internal responsibility is the commitment to ethical considerations. Ethical problems may vary considerably but often concern one or more of three elements. At one level, there are questions of ascribed ethics, situations in which we discuss the demands that stem from our notions of civil virtue. John Rohr has argued, for example, that the Constitution, if properly and carefully considered, provides a variety of regime values that should guide administrative behavior (Cooper, 2007).

Chapter 1
Introduction
Criminal justice is the application or study of laws regarding criminal behavior. Those who study criminal justice include the police, those working in a judiciary capacity, and lawyers who either defend or prosecute those accused of a crime. It is important that the criminal justice system include the word justice, since laws applied to those accused of a crime should be fair (www.wisegeek.com/what-is-criminal-justice.htm). Justice also refers not only to the fair trail accorded to the citizens of most countries, but also to the just retribution for victims of a crime, as for example, seeing an offender jailed. Criminal justice is always a goal. All involved in the arrest, prosecution, defense or judgment of a suspect aim to be fair. However, this goal is not always met, accounting for the flexibility in the application of laws, the changes to laws that are unfair, and the judiciary power of interpretation (www.wisegeek.com/what-is-criminal-justice.htm). A criminal justice system is a set of legal and social institutions for enforcing the criminal law in accordance with a defined set of procedural rules and limitations. In the United States, there are separate federal, state, and military criminal justice systems, and each state has separate systems for adults and juveniles (law.jrank.org/pages/858/Criminal-Justice-System.html - Cached - Similar). Criminal justice is the system of practices and institutions of governments directed at upholding social control, deterring and mitigating crime, and sanctioning those who violate laws with criminal penalties and rehabilitation efforts. The rights of the accused are rights that protect those accused of crime (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Criminal_justice). According to Dye, The deterrence strategy in criminal justice policy focuses on punishment –its certainty,...
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