How Do Both Characters in the Short Story "Sonnys Blues" Insiders and Outsiders? to What or Whom?

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Symbolism is often used in the story “A Rose for Emily”, but three main symbols particularly stick out. The word “rose” is important from the very beginning of the story as it first appears in the title. The word “rose” has various meanings, the first being the verb to rise. When a deputation came to visit they were showed in by Tobe, her “manservant” (pg 233), and “they rose when she entered” (pg 234). This shows a sign of respect for Miss Emily, a respect that may only be reserved for her because she is of higher class and seen as superior. This shows how she is treated specially because of the decaying social order that makes her higher class even though she is now poor. Another very important symbol is Tobe, her supposed “manservant”. Although slavery was over, African Americans were still treated very unfairly and although they could have jobs, their jobs often resembled what a slave might do and they earned very little money. Therefore, Tobe is a symbol for slavery and many people wanting to keep their antebellum south alive and well. “Daily, monthly, yearly we watched the Negro grow grayer and more stooped, going in and out with the market basket” (pg 239). Tobe stayed his whole life probably because, living in the house that has held onto the past, he was probably told he would not be able to find work elsewhere and could not find his place in the world anywhere other than Miss Emily’s house. Finally, Miss Emily herself and her house are the biggest symbol. They represent the past that no one will bother and no one will disrupt because, in the town’s peoples hearts, they want to hold onto this great past as long as they possibly can, and Miss Emily and her house is the vessel for that. The house “was a big, squarish frame house that had once been white, decorated with cupolas and spires and scrolled balconies in the heavily lightsome stile of the seventies, set on what had once been our most select street”(pg 233-34). The house stood alone as a...
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