How Did the Stalemate End?

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How Did The Stalemate End?

The stalemate came about at Christmas 1914 along the Western Front. From there the different countries fought each other in different battles and tried to outflank the other. By March 1918 the stalemate was broken. In this question I will explain why the war ended and why Germany was finally beaten.

New Technology like the Tank

New technology was very important for the reason in which the stalemate on the western front was broken.

The idea of tanks was brought up during the war but unfortunately this idea was rejected. It wasn’t until September 1916 that the first war tank was made by the British as a sort of mobilised pillbox with caterpillar tracks that could advance forward under withering machine guns; it was also made to crush wire and obstacles and to provide fire support for advancing infantry. The abilities of the tank were very high and technological in that time. The tanks had to have a top speed of 4mph on flat land, the ability to turn sharply at top speed, to climb a high foot parapet, to cross and eight feet gap and a working radius of 20 miles. The tank was first used in the village of flers on the Somme. On the battle field came major problems for the first tank such as; only been able to travel 10k per hour, the tanks couldn’t take the muddy land and eventually got stuck; it was also later found out in the war medical report itemising the terrible health problem the tank crew were getting – from skin rashes to burning of the nose and throat by fumes. This was improved at the battle of Cambre in November 1917.

Poisonous may have been one of the most feared weapons throughout the world war. To be accurate the first gas was in used August 1914 by the French who used tear gas grenades containing xylyl bromide on the Germans. The Germans thought a great deal of bring poison gas as a way to inflicting a major defeat on an enemy. In April 1915 the poisonous gas chlorine was used at the second battle of the Ypres. It was around 17:00 hours on the 22nd April did the French realized that there was a yellow-green cloud was coming towards them. The French thought this was only a smoky screen to disguise the forward movement of the German troops, so the French were ordered to fire but right in the path of the chlorine. The impact of the gas was devastating. Now that the other countries have seen this; those with the ability of manufacturing poisonous gas could use this and blame it on the Germans as they were the first to use it. The German let poisonous gas go above their trenches at Ypres. As the wind was in the Germans favour, it drifted off towards the British trenches about 200 metres away. It was the infantries turn, along part of the British frontline the wind had changed and the poisonous gas blew back at the British causing 2,000 severe casualties with seven fatalities. The use of gas leads to the use of two new gases phosgene and mustard gas. Phosgene was very dangerous as its impact was frequently felt only 48 hours after it had been inhaled and by then it had already bedded itself in the respiratory organs of the body and little could be done to eradicate it. Mustard gas caused both internal and external blisters on the victim within hours of being exposed to it and if you had survived it would have made you the result was blindness. Special masks were invented to protect themselves for the dangerous gases so only 3,000 died from the gases in the whole war.

I don’t really think that New Technology brought them any further to break the stalemate. Tanks allowed the Allies to cross no-man's land safely and to punch holes inside German lines, leaping trenches while bullets pinged off their hulls. Once the tanks hand broken through, the infantry could safely cross no-man's land and consolidate the tanks gains, without being mowed down by a hail of bullets from enemy trenches. Certain technologies helped certain forces but none were determining factors. The British...
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