How Did Hitler Become Chancellor in 1933?

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How did Hitler become Chancellor in 1933?
Many events took place, leading to the rise of Hitler and his Nazi party. There was the growing unpopularity of the Weimar Republic, the federal republic established in 1919. At the same time, Hitler and his political party, the ‘Deutsche Arbeiterpartei’, commonly referred to as the Nazis (National Socialist German Workers’ Party) became more and more popular under the rule of their leader, Adolf Hitler. This rise to popularity was the effect of Hitler’s dramatic yet effective speeches and the rumours that he spread about the Jews whilst he was in jail, writing his book, “Mein Kampf”. Following World War I, the Weimar Republic emerged from the German Revolution in November 1918. The later period of liberal democracy lapsed in the early 1930s, leading to the ascent of the Nazi Party and Adolf Hitler in 1933. The legal measures taken by the Nazi government in February and March 1933 meant that the government could legislate contrary to the constitution. The republic nominally continued to exist until 1945, as the constitution was never formally repealed. However, the measures taken by the Nazis in the early part of their rule rendered the constitution irrelevant. Thus, 1933 is usually seen as the end of the Weimar Republic and the beginning of Hitler's Third Reich, or Nazi Germany. In 1929, the American Stock Exchange collapsed, and caused an economic depression. America called in all its foreign loans, destroying the Weimar government. Unemployment in Germany rose to 6 million. The government did not know what to do. In July 1930 Chancellor Brüning cut government expenditure, wages and unemployment pay - the worst thing to do during a depression. He could not get the Reichstag to agree to his actions, so President Hindenburg used Article 48 to pass the measures by decree. Article 48 allowed the President, under certain circumstances, to take emergency measures without the prior consent of the Reichstag. Anger and...
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