How Computer Hardware and Software Work Together

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How does computer software and hardware work together? This is kind of a complex question. I think the most important thing connecting software and hardware would probably be the register. Commands or services requested by the software are encoded into binary values of 0’s and 1’s and are written into a register. For example, some register may hold a value of "01101100". This encoding has a total of 8 bits. Each value of either 0 or 1 is called a bit, and 8 bits are called a byte. At the hardware level, the computer hardware does not see these 0’s and 1’s as numbers, but as voltage levels. For example, a high voltage of 3 volts may represent a 1 and a low voltage of near 0 volts may represent a 0. These high and low voltages are fed into a series of ogic gates which then, through the correct logic design, will go about with producing the results needed by that particular software command. For example, if the software is requesting a calculation, the hardware logic gates may add the first two bits of the encoding together, produce a result of 1 (0+1 = 1), and then write this result into another register somewhere for the software to go fetch and read. Or, if the encoding is a request for some kind of service, the logic gates may in turn access or write into some other registers which would trigger other logic gates to inititiate this service. But again, this is a very complex process with many variations depending on what kind of technologies the designers of the system choose to use. What is a motherboard you ask? The motherboard is a printed circuit board (PCB) that contains and controls the components that are responsible for processing data. The motherboard contains the CPU, memory, and basic controllers for the system. Motherboards are often sold with a CPU. The motherboard has a Real-time clock (RTC), ROM BIOS, CMOS RAM, RAM sockets, bus slots for attaching devices to a bus, CPU socket or slot, cache RAM slot or sockets, jumpers, keyboard controller,...
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