How Accurate Was the Term "Era of Good Feelings" in the United States Following the War of 1812?

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In the 1800’s following the war of 1812, the term commonly applied to that era in the United States was known as the “era of good feelings”. While the United States was growing in several different aspects, such as politically, socially and economically, and changing as a country, there are several key factors that denote this term, and nullify its meaning. While the changes were significant, and the United States evolved at an exponential rate after the war of 1812, the accuracy of the term “era of good feelings” is way off, and the United States was anything but experiencing an “era of good feelings”.

Following the war of 1812, growth occurred primarily economically, politically, and socially for the United States. These changes indicated symbolize development, expansion of both land and industry, and a sense of unifying nationalism within the citizens of the United States. Although Nationalism seemed to unify the nation, there was more of an underlying indication of a much larger problem, Sectionalism. Sectionalism is a relation to a geographic area. So whereas people could have felt patriotic towards the United States, they related more towards the region they lived in and not the country they were a part of. This sectionalism also indicates a difference in the economic, social and political stances of regions such as the North and the South, and the “era of good feelings” continued to simply widen that gap.

Economically, the United States was experiencing growth. But looking further into sectionalism, there are two completely different growths present in the northern United States and the Southern United States. In the north, following the war of 1812, a rapid expansion occurred in the industry of the north. Technological advances such as the textile mills, and factory workers and the increase in the amount of factories in the North helped create a gap in the economy of the north itself. A lower class, comprised of the workers, got low wages and...
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