Hosting and Bidding for Mega Events: Issues Developing Countries Face

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The Issues Developing Countries face when Hosting and bidding for ‘Mega Events’

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Table of Contents
Conclusion and Outlook based on Selection Criteria…………………………………..…..P223

I.Introduction4

II.Developed Nations traditionally host ‘Mega-Events’6

I.23

II.23

III.23

IV.Conclusion and Outlook based on selection criteria23

Findling, John, Pelle, Kimberly Encyclopedia of the modern Olympic movement, Greenwood Publishing group, 200625

Gleeson, Mark. "SA faces $1bn World Cup stadium bill." Mail & Guardian [JOHANNESBURG] 1 Oct. 2006. Print.25

Hall, Alan  "10,000 hookers, mob wars, drugs and Pounds 10billion... the Mafia can'twait for German World Cup 2006” :[Final 1 Edition]. " The Sun  2  Jul 2002, ProQuest Newsstand, ProQuest. Web.  17 Aug. 2009.25

Hohler, Bob "OLYMPIC WORLD TURNS WITH EVER-LESS AMERICAN INFLUENCE :[THIRD Edition]. " Boston Globe  20  Feb. 2006,ProQuest National Newspapers Premier, ProQuest. Web.  19 Aug. 2009.25

II. Klettner, Andrew “London 2012: designing for legacy” Web.  13 Aug. 2009.25

Table of Contents

Introduction………………………………………………………………………………….P3

Table: Developed Nations traditionally host ‘mega-events’………...………………………P5

The Selection Process……………………………………………………………….…….....P6

The Selection Criteria: Legacy and Economic impact…………….………………………...P7

The Selection Criteria: Political and Economic support…...…………………….…………..P9

The Selection Criteria Environment and Meteorology.………….....………………..…..…P11

The Selection Criteria Venues and Travel Distances……………………….……………...P13

Additional Selection Criteria, Past Events and Sports legacy……………......…...………..P15

Unofficial Selection Criteria: Politics…………………………………………...………….P17

Qatar, a Developing Nation Seeking ‘mega-events’……………..………………………...P19

Conclusion and Outlook based on Selection Criteria…………………………………..…..P22

Bibliography……………………….……………………………………………….………P24

Introduction

Traditionally ‘Mega’ sports events such as the World Cup and the Summer Olympic Games have been reserved for highly developed countries such as The U.S, U.K, France and Spain. The only developing nations to host the World Cup in its 76 years’ history are Brazil (who have a rich soccer tradition), their South American neighbors Chile, Uruguay and Argentina, and Mexico, who hosted the FIFA World Cup in 1986.

2010 and 2014 will see developing nations South Africa and Brazil hosting the World Cup. This was as part of a continental rotational policy that saw the World Cup be awarded to a different continent every 4 years. This policy was later scrapped in 2004, one of the stated reason for changing the rotation principle was the fact that only one candidate, Brazil, put forth a bid for 2014 FIFA World Cup from the South American confederation. Sepp Blatter, the FIFA president, later commented that "The rotation principle has served its purpose and has enabled us to award our most prestigious competition to Africa for the first time and… South America for the first time in many years" (FIFA.com).

Skeptics would argue that the reason the rotation principle was scrapped was because this policy would mean that the World Cup would be hosted in Europe once every 30 years and this was not feasible for a continent that created the game and was home to soccer’s elite teams, leagues and stadiums. Europe is also a lucrative destination for FIFA due to the richness of the television rights from European broadcasters as well as the sponsorship revenue from European companies.

In the case of the Olympics, the list of host cities is even more exclusive. Madrid is the only major European capital that has never hosted the Olympics, though Barcelona staged the 1992 Games (Wilson). The only city that could be considered a developing host city was Mexico in the 1968 Olympics. Rio Di Janeiro was also a strong candidate for the 2012 Olympics. It should be noted...
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