Horse Slaughter: the Truth Unveiled

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  • Topic: Slaughterhouse, Horse meat, Horse
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Horse Slaughter: The Truth Unveiled
Amanda Martin
English 101
November 28, 2012

The Causes of horse slaughter have many surprising effects people wouldn’t think of. The drastic nature of these events changes the economy, as well as the lives of those who need products that come from horses. There are many people for and against the slaughter of horses, which has affected the situation in itself. Horse slaughter affects the economy, the mortality and standard of living of horses, and the availability of needed horse byproducts on an international level, no matter a person’s thoughts on the subject. First off, horse slaughter affects the economy in both positive and negative ways, but what is happening now? When horse slaughter is legalized, there is a higher horse market due to meat buyer’s competition. Horses sold at auction are sold to the highest bidder, of which a meat buyer will gladly bid up a buyer until they are paying an unruly amount. This is good for the market, but bad for the buyer. Although, when a meat buyer does win, the horse will be slaughtered and most likely exported to Mongolia and Kazakhstan. This is where horse meat is a primary source of food. Slaughter houses also create lots of jobs, from hauling to working on the floor and packaging. This both strengthens trust between countries and strengthens the economy. However, when slaughter is illegal, horses are shipped to Mexico and Canada, the closest countries. Slaughter houses shut down, and with the horses jobs follow. It costs more in fuel and takes away from the profit the US could be making. Why fight jobs that the United States clearly needs? Then again, since horse slaughter is now legalized the horse market is now steadily rising, as well as jobs. But with the good come the bad. Due to the drought this year, hay and grain prices skyrocketed, and people who were paying three dollars for a bale of hay are now paying a hefty five dollars. Take some math into consideration. If a person owns 4 horses and feeds a bale of hay a day, this makes it $45 a week, $180 a month, and $2160 annually on feed alone. This plus dentistry, veterinary care, and Farrier work, can add up to quite a lot. “Alison LaCarrubba, a veterinarian who heads the equine ambulatory section at the University of Missouri in Columbia, said that the unwanted horse population has risen as the cost of purchasing a horse has dropped, but the cost of keeping a horse has stayed the same. LaCarrubba said it costs about $60 per month to feed a horse hay and grain, depending on pasture availability. With regular veterinary costs for hoof trimming, de-worming, vaccinations and dental work, combined with the costs for fencing and shelter, the price to keep a horse adds up quickly, to as much as $15,000 per year. “ (Horses, 2011). The corn crop is weak this year, and horses have to compete with cows with who gets priority. Farmers are even feeding their cows gummy bears instead of corn because it is cheaper. This may help out crop farmers, but it certainly doesn’t make owning horses any easier. On another note, horse slaughter affects the mortality and standard of living of horses. When it is legalized, horses are bought and sold as usual, horses wind up in bad homes as much as dogs and cats, and there are a number of propaganda to shut down slaughter houses because they are cruel. When it is illegal more harm than good is done. Though horses are not slaughtered, they may starve to death of be abused otherwise, due to the fact that they are not wanted. Since sales of horses go down, people no longer want to sell the animals while the price of feed stays the same, creating a terrible situation in which the owner cannot feed them. Horses suffer “A double whammy of economic turmoil and a ban on horse slaughter has resulted in a steadily growing number of unwanted horses with owners who are unable to properly care for them. Equine veterinarians are seeing more thin, poorly cared for and...
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