Horse Care

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Name: LaDonna Kasinger
Topic: Care of horses
Organizational Pattern: Topical
Specific Purpose Statement: I want my audience to understand the basic care of horses.

I. Attention-Getting Device: Speed, agility, 1200 lbs of pure muscle, long wavy locks, gentleness, a dream? I think not. Horses are one of the most majestic animals but are very time consuming and costly. II. Orientation Phase:

A. Credibility: As an owner of a horse, I can fully understand the proper love and care a horse requires each and every day. B. Adaptations: Some of you may already be horse owners; however, for those who are not currently horse owners, you may be in the future or you may have a friend that may ask for advice on horses. C. Point: Horses at one time were the backbone of our society. People depended on them to bring letters from family or businesses out of walking distance. Horses have pulled plows to help farmers raise crops to feed their families and provide income. Horses were also used by law enforcement in the pursuit and apprehension of criminals. They were also used to pull stagecoaches and wagons in order to move people and goods from town to town. D. Preview: Throughout my speech you will learn the basic steps in the care of horses A. Healthy diets

B. Grooming
C. Medical care
Transition: Let’s begin by looking at the basic feeding involved in keeping your horse healthy and happy. III. Body: An average saddle horse will consume approximately 15 to 20 pounds of hay, pasture, and grain daily. A. The majority of a horse’s diet consists of forage such as hay. B. A horse needs an average of 10-12 gallons of clean, fresh water daily. C. A horse may also need grains, such as corn and oats to balance their diet and maintain weight. D. A horse may also need access to a salt or mineral block. Transition: Let’s move on to basic grooming.

IV. Grooming your horse is a necessary task that allows...
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