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Honor Is Cyrano de Bergerac

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Honor Is Cyrano de Bergerac

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Honor in Cyrano de Bergerac
People in today’s society have many different aspects about their character that make them who they are. Positive character traits can be found in people around the globe and in the characters that many read about in books. Edmond Rostand presents the character Cyrano in the play Cyrano de Bergerac with a many positive traits that make him a very relatable character. Cyrano lives his life based on a strict code of honor through his actions.

A code of honor can be seen in the way Cyrano acts towards himself. His pride shows this many times throughout the play. One example of this is when Cyrano fights Valvert over his own nose whilst at the play in the beginning of the novel. This shows that he respects himself and does not feel as though others should be able to point out his flaws. His own integrity also reveals his honor. When Cyrano talks with de Guiche about changing his poetry so they can sell it he says, “Impossible, sir; my blood curdles at the thought of having a single comma changed” (87). This scene reveals that Cyrano cannot be so easily morally corrupted because he expresses himself through his own works. Honor is also revealed in his altruism. The fact that Cyrano does not want to date Roxane, even after Christian dies, reveals this. This shows that he is unselfish and wants to put the wants and needs of others before his own. Cyrano’s sense of honor can be seen all throughout the play in his actions towards himself.

Cyrano’s code of honor is shown in the way that he acts towards his friends. His service rather than selfishness reveals this code of honor. One example of this was when he helps Christian impress Roxane by helping him speak more eloquently and intelligently all throughout the book. He goes out of his way to do something for his friend so that Christian can be happy. Cyrano’s loyalty towards Ragueneau also reveals his code of honor. This makes an appearance when he attempts to tell him that the poets...