Homeschooling: a Social Disaster or a Worthy Cause

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Home Schooling: A Social Disaster or a Worthy Cause?

Home schooling is and always has been a topic of great controversy in the educational field. I personally chose to look further into its depths due to my interest in potentially becoming a teacher. The debate about home-schooled students versus those who are schooled through public education has always interested me, and I wanted to discover more tangible information on the topic through research. I know that the debate over resources from public school districts being given to home school families is a heated one; I also know that the effectiveness of being schooled at home is always being analyzed. My goal is to come to a conclusion on the effectiveness of homes schooling and decide whether or not I believe that they deserve the resources of public schools. In doing so, I intend to evaluate other types of schooling methods. Home schooling is a highly controversial issue that, consequently, beckons a thorough evaluation.

Home schooling is an issue constantly in the spotlight. There are people on both ends of the spectrum; home schooling could be the greatest thing to happen or the worst. Many parents will choose to home school because they have an issue with the other systems of schooling for one reason or another. A parent may home school because he would like complete control of his child’s curriculum (Hurley). In many cases, this relates to a stricter religion within the family. A parent might feel that his child would be corrupted by the general curriculum of a public school, especially one that does not pertain to the family’s respective religion. Another reason many choose to home school is that other methods of schooling are too crowded. Parents say that they “want their child to have a more individualized approach to education which can only be met in the home environment.” Also, the social environment in public schools is not deemed appropriate by many parents. This coincides with the point that “[s]ince there are (usually) no other children around, home-schooled children learn in a relatively calm, peaceful environment” (Chen). Some parents have the argument that home schooling is cheaper. There are whole sections of the book Home Schooling From Scratch: Simple Living, Super Learning dedicated to saving money: “Ask your local librarian what they do with old magazines and offer to carry them off for posters, murals, and recipe collections” (Kenyon 34). This makes it clear that the demographic of home schooling is one full of people who like to save money. The typical method of home schooling is similar to most other schooling in that textbooks and workbooks are used (“Homeschooling”). However, there are many varieties within the home schooling field. The types of home schooling include but are not limited to the following: unschooling, which is the method of abandoning typical techniques and focusing on daily experiences; computer-based home schooling, which is now known as “cyber-schooling”; Charlotte-Mason home schooling, which is a method with heavy focus on classic literature; eclectic home schooling, which is combining a multitude of methods. The reasons parents choose to home school their students are logical and measure up acceptably to those of parents with other schools of thought.

The oppositions to home schooling, of course, are public and private schools, whose ideals may be very similar to home school parents or very different; it all depends on perspective. It is obvious that public schooling is the more popular option for education. A parent’s reasoning may simply lie in public school being the norm. As they were educated in this manner and most others are, it makes sense to pass on this form of education. Another reason parents will choose public schooling is for the guaranteed social interaction. Mark Klein, the superintendent of Council Rock School District, puts forth some of the goals of public schooling: “While academic...
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