Homemakers

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Homemaking: the forgotten profession

“Our work has never been appreciated by society” laments Mrs. Nahar, wondrous housewife and doting mother of two. Being an army officer’s wife meant that she had to make many compromises through the course of her adult life and then motherhood added to her responsibilities. She could not follow through with some of the many goals she had set for herself and in her voice today you can detect a sense of deep longing.

The transition of a woman starts from her infantile days as a young, carefree girl frolicking in her father’s home to when she is gradually groomed and ready to graduate onto becoming someone’s wife and a mother in her husband’s home; this had been the traditional psyche inbred into our heads about the roles of a woman. But, there are powerful misappropriations with that statement and the use of the term, ‘husband’s home’ belittles the illustrious role of women today.

A female is of equal substance in the semblance of the world and she goes through all the stages of life as do the male species. But the art of homemaking and being a stay-at-home-mom is the privilege reserved only for our species, not forgetting the miracle of motherhood. Then why is it that being a housewife is viewed negatively in society today? The popular explanation of traditional idealists is that in today’s dog-eat-dog world, money is everything. Mercenaries are aplenty and a person is adjudged to ‘have substance’ based on the money he or she earns. Being a housewife does not yield monetary returns so the profession is deemed unworthy of respect and merit.

En contraire, Mrs. Nahar argues that housewives are one of the more important resources of any nation but they need to be engaged in activity to avail of their full potential. By the time the morning rush is over and everyone has left for school or work and she has cleaned the morning mess, she becomes free for the day for a wide time frame of 11 am to 5 or 6 pm every weekday....
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