Home Depot

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Home Depot

National University

Prof. David R. Smith

BUS 480

By:

John Valadez

December 17, 2011

Table of Contents

I. Introduction………………………….……………………….…………………………………3 II. History & Purpose of the Study……....…………………………………………………….….5 III. Methodology…………………………………………………………………………………..9 IV. Findings………..……………………………………………………………………………...9 V. Recommendations……..………………………………….…………………………………..15 VI. Implementation Plan…..……………………………………………………………………..15 VII. Appendix….………………………………………………………………………………...18 VIII. References….……..………………………………………………………………………..29 IX. Exhibits....……………………………………………………………………………………30

I. Introduction
Home Depot Incorporated has become an important aspect in the world of building, designing and construction for millions of businesses and home owner nationwide to include Canada, Mexico and China. Home Depot is considered the largest home improvement store in the United States which many people have purchased and utilized their merchandise for years such as building materials, home improvement goods, lawn and garden products. Home Depot also provides services to assist in designing homes and installation services for multiple products. Additional stores were added to the Home Depot chain such as Home Expo that sold high quality products that specialized in decorating homes and remodeling specific projects. All 34 Home Expo stores were closed down in January of 2009. Home Depot continuously strives to stay ahead or match a few of its competitors such as Lowe’s Company Inc., True Value Company and Ace Hardwar. As a prior employee, one can attest that Home Depot instills their values to make a difference from an employee’s point of view. During the middle of 2007, Home Depot began to experience decline in business due to subprime lending and high interest rates. This began a trend in decline in new construction and home owner renovation. Eight Corporate Values were established to provide employees with a guideline for success at Home Depot. They are “Taking care of our people”, “Giving back to our communities”, “Doing the right thing”, “Excellent Customer Service”, “Create shareholder value”, “Building strong relationships”, “Entrepreneurial sprit” and “Respect for all people”. (About.com, Retail Industry, 2011). Listed is the top management for Home Depot retrieved from Datamonitor report as of Aug, 2010. Frank Blake, 60, has been the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer at Home Depot since 2007. Earlier, he served as the Vice Chairman and Executive Vice President, Business Development and Corporate Operations of the company. Mr. Blake was the US Deputy Secretary of Energy from 2001 to 2002. Prior to this, he was the Senior Vice President of General Electric Company from 2000 to 2001 and Vice President of GE Power Systems from 1996 to 2000.

David H. Batchelder, 60, has been a Director at Home Depot since 2007. From 1988 to 2005, he was also a Principal of Relational Advisors, a financial advisory and investment banking firm that he founded. Prior to founding Relational, Mr. Batchelder held various executive positions at Mesa Petroleum Company, including Chief Financial Officer and Chief Operating Officer, and served on Mesa’s board of directors. Prior to his affiliation with Mesa, he was an Audit Manager with Deloitte & Touche. Mr. Batchelder serves as a Director at Intuit as well.

Ari Bousbib, 48, has been a Director at Home Depot since 2007. Since 2008, he has also served as Executive Vice President of United Technologies Corporation (“UTC”), a diversified company, and President of UTC’s Commercial Companies. From 2002 to 2008, Mr. Bousbib held the position of President of Otis Elevator Company and from 2000 to 2002 served as its Chief Operating Officer. During 1997-2000 he was Vice President, Corporate Strategy and Development of UTC. Prior to joining UTC, Mr. Bousbib was a partner at Booz Allen Hamilton, a global...
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