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Holdens lonliness and his inab

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Holdens lonliness and his inab

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HOLDENS LONLINESS AND HIS INABLITY TO GROW UP Holden is essentially a loner. His biggest problem is that he is very depressed because he has no one to talk to. Although Holden is friendly with many people at school, and although he has several friends in New York, he is constantly lonesome and in need of someone who will sympathise with his feelings of alienation. But the question that arises is why is he such a loner. The reason is that he cannot cope with people, with school, or with every day problems that people his age must face. He avoids reality by living a fantasy life, and every forced contact with reality drives him deeper. Holden cannot communicate effectively. On many occasions in the book we observe that Holden can't deal with pleasant situation. This is the reason for half of his problems. He does not take responsibility for his own actions. Teens his age are supposed to be responsible for their actions and conduct but Holden has a habit of never owning up his mistake, instead he always blames some one else for his follies. He has no commitment towards important human relation such as parents, friends, teachers etc. He subjects every one he meets to a probing examination, and almost every one fails. This factor also significantly contributes toward his loneliness.

Holden's inability to communicate and deal with people effectively is probably the largest obstruction in his path to maturity. Throughout the book we see that how hard is it for Holden to have a normal conversation. The very fragmentation of Holden's speech, his frequent of phrases like 'sort of', 'and all', and 'I mean'; shows his ineptitude in conversation. For example, after his conversation with the two nuns, he was glad that they didn't ask him if he was a catholic or not, because, "That kind of stuff drives me crazy. I am not saying that it ruined our conversation or any thing - it didn't - but it sure as hell didn't do it any good", (pg. 113,para I) and, "It wouldn't have...