Hogsmeadow Case Study

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  • Topic: Garden, Gardening, Garden centre
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  • Published : March 11, 2012
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HOGSMEADOW GARDEN CENTRE

Table of Contents
Pages
Introduction………………………………………………………………………….………..3 Assumptions……………………………………………………………………………….…..4 Micro-Operations at Hogsmeadow Garden Centre…………………………….…………..5 Problems regarding the managing and developing of Hogsmeadow Garden Centre…….6 Constraints being faces by Hogsmeadow Garden Centre………………………………..…7 Key Success Factors……………………………………………………………………………8 Recommendations………………………………………………………………………………9 Resources Needed to Implement this System……………………………………………….11 Could This Be Implemented In Jamaica?...............................................................................13 Appendix………………………………………………………………………………………..14

Introduction
Hogsmeadow Garden Centre is conveniently located half a mile outside the well known tourist area Cotswold in the UK. It is situated on twelve hectares of land, which the owner, Don Dursley, says he would like to fully develop. The centre prides them self on offering high quality items and offers a wide range of products, from plants and shrubs to outdoor clothing and kitchen equipment. The centre has a number of success factors that have contributed to their sales growing by 10 per cent. Despite this, Dursley is faced with several problems in managing and developing the centre which have aided in costs escalating to over 15 per cent. It is these problems and more that Dursley must address in order for his costs to decrease and for his revenue to grow.

Assumptions
Question #1:
Describe all assumptions made and the basis for such assumptions. The Hogsmeadow Garden Centre is situation in a prime location as it is situated in the popular tourist area, Cotswolds, in the UK. The area is equipped with a good system of main roads, however, Hogsmeadow Garden Centre is inaccessible by public transport, it is assumed that it is inaccessible because public transport is not allowed on the property. Don Dursley, owner of the garden centre, stated that he wanted to fully develop the twelve hectares of land where the centre is located; this suggests that there is a great amount of unutilized space at the garden centre. Products at the centre are of very high quality, and tend to be more expensive than other smaller garden centres with prices going as high as £3700; it is assume that Hogsmeadow caters to a more upscale clientele. The restaurant on the premises, Honeydukes is part self-service and part assisted service. During peak hours, some customers have to ‘save’ seats by putting their coats and bags on them. As a result, the size of the restaurant is not adequate to accommodate the traffic of customers. It is difficult for the centre to decide how much of each product to order. “We just never get this right. Every year we agonise over how much to buy,” stated Dursley; this hints that the garden centre does not have an accurate forecasting system in place. Dursley also stated that it was very tedious to try to get the right number of staff with the right mix of skills, this implies that he does not use aggregate planning strategies. The garden centre does not have a website and does not make use of technology to carry out various tasks.

Micro-Operations at Hogsmeadow Garden Centre
Question #2:
List the main micro-operations at Hogsmeadow Garden Centre and describe the main input resources, transformation process and outputs for each item. i) The Restaurant:
Input- Food, **hungry customers, including mothers with small children Transformation – Needs are satisfied in this process where the waitresses and chefs are the necessary components. Meals are prepared by chefs by making use of the input materials. Customers are served by staff. Output – Customer become satisfied after enjoying the meals and services provided.

ii) Indoor Sales Area:
Input – Products and shoppers
Transformation – Sales people are the components which mean how well are their promoting skills to compel customers to shop. Output – Satisfied shoppers when...
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