Hitler's Rise to Power

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Adolf Hitler, Austrian-born German politician and leader of the National Socialist German Workers Party gained victory as the Fuhrer (Combination of Chancellor and President) only 10 years after the Munich Putsch of 1923. Many factors contributed to his rise to power within this period. Factors include his charismatic personality, key individuals and groups, President Paul Von Hindenburg, Franz Von Papen, Kurt Von Schleicher, Dr Joseph Goebbel. The role of these key individuals influenced the significant events assessing how Hitler was able to rise to power, Wall Street Crash, The Great Depression, Political Elections, Reichstag Fire, Implementation of the Enabling Act and the Death of Hindenburg. This lead to one of the most important historical events of time, Hitler’s rise to power by 1933. Due to Germany's defeat in November 1918, the severe economical and political instabilities Germany faced in the early 1930's, remarkably aided Hitler's rise to power. This introduced the onslaught of hyperinflation 1923 and the disastrous crisis of the Great Depression 1929. The Weimar Republic suffered political disorder, violence and economic hardship. One in particular, the signing of The Treaty of Versailles, specifically the guilt clause 231, a dictated treaty "diktat" forced upon them, given responsibility for the destructions and deaths caused during the First World War. The Treaty demanded a loss of 15% of land, 12% of people, 10% of industry and a total reparations bill set of US$32 billion dollars. This in turn created immense hatred toward the government, referred these Political signatories of the Armistice as "November Criminals" of which was believed to be unpatriotic. Karl Ludecke, an early follower of Hitler in 1924 expresses "Of course, I was ripe for this experience. I was a man of 32, weary with disgust and disillusionment, a wanderer seeking a cause, patriot seeking an outlet for his patriotism." Therefore, this emphasises on the increased discontent...
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