History: United States Constitution and Alexander Hamilton

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History 109
Yufei Zhang
Prof: Lieser
Unified of the American Constitution

What was the original intent of the U.S. Constitution? Why did Alexander Hamilton want to create a more powerful centralization of federal government? What is the difference between Democratic-Republican and Federalist? Analyzing and resolving constitutional issues was an ongoing process during the eighteenth century. According to Jack Rakove “… from a historical perspective this book, guidelines, approval around the constitution, form political worries about reviewing in 1780, the Constitution and the clarification of the scope that "the debate on the role of the original intent of the constitutional debate" should be interpreted to play.” 1 Also Rakove thinks the federal constitution must be developed to address the representatives of the executive power and the rights and constitutional concepts in a way reflecting the highest law. The federal convention or intense political debate followed. Similar to Rakove, some people believed the Constitution could give people clearer rules to tell them what they were supposed to do or not. In addition, the Constitution could also prohibit the government from what they should not do. The government needs to guarantee freedom for people, and what rights belong to people couldn’t be violated. The Constitution also remains above the government; while maintaining above the people, it's like a barrier to prevent the government from expanding. The Constitution could guarantee justice and equity for what the government sometimes did, like being secretive, and corrupt, which violates and ignores the Constitution by following the money of corporations, lobbyists, and bankers that are destroying our country, freedoms, economy, and our way of life. It provides a set of hard-fast rules for the creation and perpetuation of a Legislature, an Executive, and a Judiciary Branch. According to Madison, he was the person strongly argued for the central of the government that would unify the country and he was the most important person to write and creation of the Constitution. People call him "Father of the Constitution." He thought a representative government suppose governed by those smaller states. The power should be limited by the Federal Government because those specific areas know what they wanted and had representatives their interests. So the best way to vote was elect representatives was social system, citizens because they lived in same of the territory, it would be easier for them to agree to work together to realize their ideas. The government should protect different rights because through their representative institutions pronunciation sounds more in line with the interests of human society and the decision of the people were subject to their own interests, such as the freedom of speech, religion and the press.

Alexander Hamilton believed the new U.S. administration should be divided into three divisions: Congress executive, legislative and judicial powers. 2 The government divided into three sections would provide checks and balances to prevent any one branch from becoming too powerful, and that by working together in three different branches can concentrate power in the state. He also believed that serving the life of good character, or, more precisely, would give stability to the administrative offices on the other hand, that short-term services only encourage politicians to focus on re-election, rather than the rule in this country. Hamilton also thought people should have bicameral: one is upper chamber, called the Senate, including the elite aristocracy of the country, and one is lower chamber, called the General Assembly. Would be the seat of democracy for the American people, Senator Election life’s by the House of Lords and the elected representatives of the elected term of three years.

According to George Washington, “from all classes of Citizens, The reflection on the days of...