History Of The Police

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History of The Police
Anthony Locken
University of Phoenix - Introduction to Police Theory and Practices

In an article on the National Law Enforcement Museum Insider it states: “More than 350 years ago, America’s first known system of law enforcement was established in Boston. As soon as colonists had settled there in 1630, local ordinances had allowed for constables to be appointed. Soon after, in April 1631, the townspeople formed a “watch” made up of six watchmen, one constable, and several volunteers who patrolled at night, walking the rounds”. Historically, the duties of being a police officer were tough. Until the early 1900s, police officers were scarce and in some cities, no formally organized policing departments had been formed. This made keeping the peace very difficult for the few persons assigned with the task. Through the prohibition era, gun battles and Mob violence caused for alarm. In general, police had a tough job but they were just beginning. Until Sir Robert Peel established the “Peelian Principals” that forever changed policing. Sir Robert Peel set forth to establish a police force that not only caught and punished criminals but he wanted them to work at lowering the crime rate of the given area that they were responsible for. In 1828 Peel established what was later called the London Metropolitan Police. This new police force was perfect to start the reforming of the way the police would enforce the law. Peel was met with resistant from England’s Parliament due to a fear of the police turning into more of a military style similar to the French style of law enforcement. 1829 is when Robert Peel established what is known today as the “Peelian Principles”. Back then these principals were the closest things that they had to laws. The nine principles are: “The basic mission for which the police exist is to prevent crime and disorder. The ability of the police to perform...
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