History of the Gameplay of Pokemon: From Pocket Monster to Pokemon

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  • Topic: Satoshi Tajiri, Pokémon, Nintendo
  • Pages : 2 (589 words )
  • Download(s) : 191
  • Published : April 7, 2013
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Much as happens with many other words and phrases borrowed from English, the Japanese name for the series, Pocket Monsters, became contracted into "Pockemon" during the development of the original games, likely as much for convenience when referring to it as to save on screen real estate, considering the small size of the Game Boy's screen. The official romanization of "Pockemon" at this time was derived from the contraction of Pocket and Monster, and can be seen explicitly in Primeape Goes Bananas, even in the dub. The "Pokémon" name used today came about during the translation of the games for an English audience during 1997 and 1998. Whereas in Japan, Pocket Monsters was easily able to be trademarked, the release in America would prove difficult had this name been used, due to the unrelated Monster in my Pocket franchise. Thus, an alternate romanization of the contraction was used, with an acute accent over the e to indicate its specific pronunciation, poh-kay-mahn. Despite this issue, however, the fact that Pokémon is short for Pocket Monsters has been referenced in English, with an NPC in Pokémon Diamond, Pearl, and Platinum asking the player what Pokémon is short for after thinking about the name of the Pokétch, itself a contraction, as well as on the back of the DVD set containing the first, second, and third movies. Franchise

Main article: History of Pokémon
Pokémon as a series was originally conceived by Satoshi Tajiri, as a way to instill in children of the modern, more urbanized Japan the same enjoyment that he felt as a young boy collecting insects near his hometown of Machida. Initially Capsule Monsters, CapuMon for short, Tajiri pitched the series to Nintendo due to the inspiration he drew from the link cable, picturing an insect crawling across it between two Game Boy systems.

Charizard's Red and Green sprite
With help from Shigeru Miyamoto, the series began development, with the concepts of the original games, Pokémon Red and Green, going...
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