History of the Erie Canal

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  • Topic: Canal, Hudson River, Erie Canal
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  • Published : September 10, 2011
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Transportation Systems and Design

Canals Railroads
[pic] [pic]

Highways
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Engineering’s Impact on Society-MST510
Professor Andrew Wolfe

Submitted by: Ryan Darling, BSMET
December 7, 2010
Revised submission: January 12, 2011

Table of Contents

• Introduction……………………………………………….…………………….....................1

• History of Canals………………………………………………………….…………...…..1-3 • Uprising of Canals………………………………………………………………….…..….3-5

• The Erie Canal……………………………………………………………………...…...…5-7

• Enlarging the Erie………………………………………………..………………….…….7-9

• The Barge Canal……………………………………………………………………….…9-11

• Railroad Development……………………………………………………………...…..11-12

• Labor Unions……………………………………………………………………………12-14

• Public Relations………...………………………………………………….……………….14

• Railway Management……………………………………………………………….….14-15

• Highway Systems……………………………………………………………………….15-16

• Beginning of Colonies…………………………………………………………………..16-17 • Safety…………………………………………………………………………………….17-19

• New Innovations…………………………………………………...……………………19-21

• Conclusion………………………………………………………………………………21-22 • Bibliography…………………….………………………………………………………23-24 • Appendices………………………………………………………………………………25-27
Darling 1
Introduction
Throughout history, the United States has discovered ways to adapt to change through the use of technology and design related to the transportation industry and has effectively overcome obstacles in order to fulfill the needs of society. To modernize the country, new ideas, plans, and designs have been developed, over time, to support the vastly growing economy and population. Our nation’s growth can be directly traced back to new forms of technology invented, developed, and reproduced for society. Three different types of transportation systems/designs that were extremely crucial and revolutionized society, over the ages, are canals (especially the Erie Canal), railroads, and highways. These different forms of transportation methods not only offered service to numerous states, but also exemplified change and advancement in industry. Other miscellaneous factors such as public relations and labor unions further played important roles in how these systems of transportation were designed and constructed. History of Canals

The practice of canal-building is an ancient art. The first artificial waterways date back from 7000 B.C. to 3500 B.C. in Egypt. They proved to be very successful before the canal-lock had been developed. Most of these canals were strictly used for irrigation and/or drainage, regulating the overflows of rivers in Babylonia and Egypt. Babylonia, at this time, led early canal building, connecting the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. The main commerce of Egypt (the delta) was run by the canals. Roads were seemingly unimportant, and wheels were very rare in this early civilization. It was said that the Egyptians had somewhere in the range of 80 canals--some more than 100 miles in length. Under the Roman Empire, their control and building of canals led to their massive rise in power over other civilizations. The most famous of these canals was the Grand Canal which stretched from the Nile to the Red Sea. The canal was said to be approximately 37 miles long, 100 feet wide and 40 feet deep. Around 486 B.C., China began to

build canals, and commerce seemed to follow upon the great rivers of the Huang-Ho and Yangtze. These waterways were navigable 2400 miles to 2900 miles from their mouths along the eastern coast. The grandest of these waterways, the Yun-Ho (Grand Canal) flowed for a total length of over 800 miles and was repeatedly enlarged and repaired. A total depth of seven to 11 feet was achieved through the construction of 75 locks across the canal which, between 605 and 618 B.C., could be opened and closed at will. Later, the Chinese began to use inclined planes with stone walls in which...
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