History of Photography

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History Of Photography

The history of photography can be a broad subject due to it is used in many ways, such as family portraits, capturing moments, to tell a story such as crime scene, family background. The word “photography” in general is from the Greek words photos which meaning “light” and graphein which means “to draw”. In the cases of forensic science which involved forensic photography will be used for documenting the suspect and the convicted criminals as well as the crime scene, victims and any other evidence that would be needed to make a conviction. The photography is widely acknowledged as this is the most accurate way to depict and document the people and objects. The forensic photography had then resulted from the modernization of criminal justice systems and the power of photographic realism. It was during the 19th and 20th centuries in which these two developments were significant to both forensic photography and to the police work in general they were attributed to a desire for accuracy. The earliest evidence of photography documentation alone of prison inmates dated back to 1843 to 1844 in Belgium and in 1851 in Denmark. The photographic documentation although was solely experimental and was yet too ruled by technical or legal regulations. The shots of them ranged from mug shot resemblances, to prisoners in their cells, and the purpose of these was varied from documentation to experimentation. There was no training at the time required and the pictures were often taken by amateurs, commercial photographers, or even the policemen or prison officials. In the 1870s, the practice of photography had spread then too many countries, which though limited to larger cities. It was then that the professional photographers would be employed to take posed portraits of the criminals, which earlier evidence led to the standard mug shot. The photography then was nothing like today this wasn’t just photographing families, children, for this was...
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