History of Nursing

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September 12, 2011
Intro to Nursing
History of the Nursing
Nursing has played a big role in our past, present and will be in the future. Do we even know what nursing really is? Many people have interpreted it as “white uniforms, nursing cap, needles and bedpans” (Pg. 32). A nurse is defined as someone that tends to the patient needs but also shows commitment, caring, and dedication. “During the early Christian era men and woman spread the philosophy of Christianity while providing nursing care to the ill” (Pg. 33). Religion influenced the value of human life through the caring of a nurse. “Deacons and Deaconesses were designated to perform services for the sick” (Doheny et. Al.,1997: Kelly & Joel, 2000, Pg. 33). They were visiting homes and dedicating their lives to charity work for sake of the sick. Phoebe was known as the deaconess in nursing history. Then the first general hospital was established by Fabiola in Rome 380 AD. “Religion once again was influential; the caring image of the nurse was believed to be based on a spiritual calling to the profession” (Pg. 35-36) Nursing took a turn for the worst in the 1800’s due to lack poor sanitation and low standards of living. Working conditions were poor, resulting in loss of social status of the members. Nursing was defined as an inferior, undesirable occupation. Many of the religious attendants were being replaced by criminals and low-class people which they began to abused and exploit the patient. The French and the Catholic Church began to recruit women from high class family to teach them how to become a reputable nurse. Canada is the major influence in health care till this day. Florence Nightingale was stubborn and unyielding and was known as the founder of modern nursing. Nightingale went against her parents’ wishes and perused the profession of nursing. She “improved health laws, reformed hospitals, reorganized military medical services” (Pg. 36). Nightingale left her position as...
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